Clinical Nurse Champions Improve Patient Outcome: Sustaining Catheter-Related BSI Reduction in Neurocritical Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157074
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical Nurse Champions Improve Patient Outcome: Sustaining Catheter-Related BSI Reduction in Neurocritical Care
Author(s):
Hujcs, Marianne; Eckhardt, Duncan; Mouradjian, Danielle
Author Details:
Marianne Hujcs, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA, email: hujcsm@uphs.upenn.edu; Duncan Eckhardt; Danielle Mouradjian
Abstract:
PURPOSE: A significant number of patients in neurocritical care are at risk for catheter related blood stream infections (CR-BSI). Multiple factors contribute to this risk including provider practice during catheter insertion, nursing practice related to line maintenance, and patient risk factors such as oral secretions, skin integrity and intra-hospital transport. Using a Champion model, clinical nurses have led efforts to improve patient safety, change practice and sustain a reduced CR-BSI rate. Description: In our Clinical Nurse Champion Model, nurses are engaged in determining practice guidelines, maintaining standards, educating providers on catheter safety and evaluating patient outcomes. Initially, interdisciplinary evidence-based standards implemented addressed aseptic technique during insertion, catheter dressing and line maintenance, central line access and IV tubing changes. Clinical nurse champions utilize checklists to evaluate standards at point of care; these measures produced a reduction in CR-BSI. After evaluation, specific guidelines for blood sampling and daily review for catheter need were established and further reduced incidence. Champions routinely conduct surveillance for practice compliance; deviations from these standards are discussed directly with our team. A clinical nurse designated as the Quality Council representative and another designated as the BSI Champion participate in hospital wide initiatives addressing CR-BSI. Monthly incidence is posted in the unit for review. Clinical nurses examine patient and system factors that contribute to each hospital acquired infection; these nurses provide peer review and identify further recommendations for improvement. EVALUATION: The incidence of CR-BSI decreased from 75th percentile to 10th percentile nationally; this reduction has been sustained for one year without additional unit based operational costs. Our project demonstrates that while initial reduction of CR-BSI is related to practice change, sustained reduction requires communication, interprofessional collaboration and established improvement processes. Utilizing a Champion model successfully engages clinical nurses to assure patient safety and improve outcome.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical Nurse Champions Improve Patient Outcome: Sustaining Catheter-Related BSI Reduction in Neurocritical Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHujcs, Marianneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEckhardt, Duncanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMouradjian, Danielleen_GB
dc.author.detailsMarianne Hujcs, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA, email: hujcsm@uphs.upenn.edu; Duncan Eckhardt; Danielle Mouradjianen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157074-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: A significant number of patients in neurocritical care are at risk for catheter related blood stream infections (CR-BSI). Multiple factors contribute to this risk including provider practice during catheter insertion, nursing practice related to line maintenance, and patient risk factors such as oral secretions, skin integrity and intra-hospital transport. Using a Champion model, clinical nurses have led efforts to improve patient safety, change practice and sustain a reduced CR-BSI rate. Description: In our Clinical Nurse Champion Model, nurses are engaged in determining practice guidelines, maintaining standards, educating providers on catheter safety and evaluating patient outcomes. Initially, interdisciplinary evidence-based standards implemented addressed aseptic technique during insertion, catheter dressing and line maintenance, central line access and IV tubing changes. Clinical nurse champions utilize checklists to evaluate standards at point of care; these measures produced a reduction in CR-BSI. After evaluation, specific guidelines for blood sampling and daily review for catheter need were established and further reduced incidence. Champions routinely conduct surveillance for practice compliance; deviations from these standards are discussed directly with our team. A clinical nurse designated as the Quality Council representative and another designated as the BSI Champion participate in hospital wide initiatives addressing CR-BSI. Monthly incidence is posted in the unit for review. Clinical nurses examine patient and system factors that contribute to each hospital acquired infection; these nurses provide peer review and identify further recommendations for improvement. EVALUATION: The incidence of CR-BSI decreased from 75th percentile to 10th percentile nationally; this reduction has been sustained for one year without additional unit based operational costs. Our project demonstrates that while initial reduction of CR-BSI is related to practice change, sustained reduction requires communication, interprofessional collaboration and established improvement processes. Utilizing a Champion model successfully engages clinical nurses to assure patient safety and improve outcome.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:23:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:23:53Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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