2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157079
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Beach Chair Position in the Intensive Care Unit: An Evaluation of Outcomes
Author(s):
Caraviello, Kelly Anne; Nemeth, Lynne
Author Details:
Kelly Anne Caraviello, Medical University of SC, Charleston, SC, USA, email: caraviek@musc.edu; Lynne Nemeth
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Bedrest in the critically ill patient leads to many complications. The Beach Chair Position (BCP) has been used to promote lung expansion, but research has not yet validated the effectiveness of this positioning technique. This study evaluates lung compliance and expansion of critical care patients placed in the BCP and hypothesizes a reduction in Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP) rates, ICU Length of Stay (LOS) and ventilator days for patients placed in the BCP. BACKGROUND: The lungs expand more efficiently in an upright position. VAP is the leading cause of death among patients with hospital-acquired infections and increases patient's ICU stay and the hospital bill. Research shows the majority of nurses are aware that upright positioning helps prevent VAP. Current guidelines related to the prevention of VAP advocate semi-recumbent positioning but limited research is available that has formally linked the effects of the BCP on VAP outcomes. METHODS: 200 ICU patients meeting inclusion criteria are placed in the BCP 4 times daily using the Hill-Rom bed. VAP rates, ventilator days, hospital LOS and ICU LOS are collected using administrative data for study patients and a retrospective cohort. Chi square analyses explore associations of the dichotomous variables: VAP and BCP positioning. The continuous variables ICU LOS and ventilator days are examined using pooled t tests. Further examination of the relationships of the main outcome variables use linear regression for continuous variables and logistic regression for categorical variables adjusting for demographic variables: age, sex, race, and unit. RESULTS: Study enrollment of the 200 patients is expected to be complete in December 2008. Preliminary data collected from 129 patients to date suggest a reduction in the rate of VAP but the entire data set is not yet complete, nor is it appropriate at this time to speculate. Results will be available by the time of NTI presentation. CONCLUSIONS: The concept of early mobilization of ventilated and sedated patients is a relatively new idea. Positive outcomes that may be demonstrated by using the BCP may lead to this positioning technique becoming a daily critical care nursing practice. One day hearing the question, "Have you put your patient into the Beach Chair Position today?" will hopefully be regarded with the same importance as today's commitment to turning patients every two hours and having the head of bed at 30 degrees.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Beach Chair Position in the Intensive Care Unit: An Evaluation of Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCaraviello, Kelly Anneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNemeth, Lynneen_GB
dc.author.detailsKelly Anne Caraviello, Medical University of SC, Charleston, SC, USA, email: caraviek@musc.edu; Lynne Nemethen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157079-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Bedrest in the critically ill patient leads to many complications. The Beach Chair Position (BCP) has been used to promote lung expansion, but research has not yet validated the effectiveness of this positioning technique. This study evaluates lung compliance and expansion of critical care patients placed in the BCP and hypothesizes a reduction in Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP) rates, ICU Length of Stay (LOS) and ventilator days for patients placed in the BCP. BACKGROUND: The lungs expand more efficiently in an upright position. VAP is the leading cause of death among patients with hospital-acquired infections and increases patient's ICU stay and the hospital bill. Research shows the majority of nurses are aware that upright positioning helps prevent VAP. Current guidelines related to the prevention of VAP advocate semi-recumbent positioning but limited research is available that has formally linked the effects of the BCP on VAP outcomes. METHODS: 200 ICU patients meeting inclusion criteria are placed in the BCP 4 times daily using the Hill-Rom bed. VAP rates, ventilator days, hospital LOS and ICU LOS are collected using administrative data for study patients and a retrospective cohort. Chi square analyses explore associations of the dichotomous variables: VAP and BCP positioning. The continuous variables ICU LOS and ventilator days are examined using pooled t tests. Further examination of the relationships of the main outcome variables use linear regression for continuous variables and logistic regression for categorical variables adjusting for demographic variables: age, sex, race, and unit. RESULTS: Study enrollment of the 200 patients is expected to be complete in December 2008. Preliminary data collected from 129 patients to date suggest a reduction in the rate of VAP but the entire data set is not yet complete, nor is it appropriate at this time to speculate. Results will be available by the time of NTI presentation. CONCLUSIONS: The concept of early mobilization of ventilated and sedated patients is a relatively new idea. Positive outcomes that may be demonstrated by using the BCP may lead to this positioning technique becoming a daily critical care nursing practice. One day hearing the question, "Have you put your patient into the Beach Chair Position today?" will hopefully be regarded with the same importance as today's commitment to turning patients every two hours and having the head of bed at 30 degrees.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:24:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:24:10Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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