2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157080
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Use of High-fidelity Simulation to Train an Inter-disciplinary Rapid Response Team
Author(s):
Carrigan, Timothy; Jaracz, Geri; Ledonne, Cindy; Nehmer, Maria
Author Details:
Timothy Carrigan, University of Illinois Medical Center at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA, email: tcarri5@uic.edu; Geri Jaracz; Cindy Ledonne; Maria Nehmer
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The Joint Commission's Patient Safety Goal #16 requires that hospitals have a system in place to recognize and respond to acute changes in patient conditions. In addition, the Institute of Medicine (2001) report Cross the Quality Chasm recommends that inter-disciplinary training occur whenever possible. Therefore, the purpose of our project was to use high-fidelity simulation to prepare rapid response team (RRT) members to recognize and treat patients in danger of imminent deterioration. Description: In healthcare providing training and assessing competency for low-volume/high-risk critical situations is difficult. In real life, training and teaching cannot readily take place due to the emergent nature of the situation. In some training exercises, like "mock codes," the sense of urgency may be lost. Therefore our solution to training inter-disciplinary members of the RRT included the use of a high-fidelity patient simulator (SimMan). The SimMan was programmed using real patient scenarios, including: seizure, abdominal pain, status asthmaticus, gastrointestinal bleeding, hypertension and stroke, diabetic emergency, heart failure exacerbation, and full cardiac arrest. Prior to responding to a rapid response call, all nurses, doctors, and respiratory therapists were required to attend the inter-disciplinary training. Inter-disciplinary groups of 4 to 6 care givers participated in all scenarios. In addition to clinical assessment and decision making, the training approach also emphasized team communication, inter-disciplinary dynamics, and a rotation of the person in charge. After the scenarios are completed the clinicians debrief to discuss aspects of the clinical response. At the end of each session evaluations were requested. EVALUATION: In all sessions the first scenario had the longest time to definitive care. In subsequent scenarios increased familiarity of team members, regardless of who was in charge, resulted in improved communication and organization. Also in each subsequent scenario low-volume/high-risk procedures became more accurate. Evaluations showed that participants felt they were better prepared to respond with the RRT. Inter-disciplinary and simulation based practice promotes RRT members' recognition of deteriorating patients, facilitates communication, and improves the performance of procedures. Organized responses of the RRT may lead to improved patient outcomes when time and decision-making are critical.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Use of High-fidelity Simulation to Train an Inter-disciplinary Rapid Response Teamen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarrigan, Timothyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJaracz, Gerien_GB
dc.contributor.authorLedonne, Cindyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNehmer, Mariaen_GB
dc.author.detailsTimothy Carrigan, University of Illinois Medical Center at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA, email: tcarri5@uic.edu; Geri Jaracz; Cindy Ledonne; Maria Nehmeren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157080-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The Joint Commission's Patient Safety Goal #16 requires that hospitals have a system in place to recognize and respond to acute changes in patient conditions. In addition, the Institute of Medicine (2001) report Cross the Quality Chasm recommends that inter-disciplinary training occur whenever possible. Therefore, the purpose of our project was to use high-fidelity simulation to prepare rapid response team (RRT) members to recognize and treat patients in danger of imminent deterioration. Description: In healthcare providing training and assessing competency for low-volume/high-risk critical situations is difficult. In real life, training and teaching cannot readily take place due to the emergent nature of the situation. In some training exercises, like "mock codes," the sense of urgency may be lost. Therefore our solution to training inter-disciplinary members of the RRT included the use of a high-fidelity patient simulator (SimMan). The SimMan was programmed using real patient scenarios, including: seizure, abdominal pain, status asthmaticus, gastrointestinal bleeding, hypertension and stroke, diabetic emergency, heart failure exacerbation, and full cardiac arrest. Prior to responding to a rapid response call, all nurses, doctors, and respiratory therapists were required to attend the inter-disciplinary training. Inter-disciplinary groups of 4 to 6 care givers participated in all scenarios. In addition to clinical assessment and decision making, the training approach also emphasized team communication, inter-disciplinary dynamics, and a rotation of the person in charge. After the scenarios are completed the clinicians debrief to discuss aspects of the clinical response. At the end of each session evaluations were requested. EVALUATION: In all sessions the first scenario had the longest time to definitive care. In subsequent scenarios increased familiarity of team members, regardless of who was in charge, resulted in improved communication and organization. Also in each subsequent scenario low-volume/high-risk procedures became more accurate. Evaluations showed that participants felt they were better prepared to respond with the RRT. Inter-disciplinary and simulation based practice promotes RRT members' recognition of deteriorating patients, facilitates communication, and improves the performance of procedures. Organized responses of the RRT may lead to improved patient outcomes when time and decision-making are critical.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:24:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:24:13Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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