2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157085
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
It Takes a Village: A Fully Implantable Heart Replacement System
Author(s):
Joiner, Jennifer
Author Details:
Jennifer Joiner, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA, email: jennifer.joiner@rwjuh.edu
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Heart failure rates have risen disproportionately to heart transplants annually. Limited choices exist for biventricular failure patients ineligible for heart transplantation. A recently approved viable alternative is a fully implantable heart replacement system, that is, an artificial heart. Nursing care is as complex as the nature of heart failure itself. We developed a unique approach to patient management, advocating for the patient while retaining the proper level of care. DESCRIPTION: Patients with an artificial heart require an extensive aggressive multidisciplinary approach because of their baseline multisystem low flow state and physical debilitation before implant. We supported the patientÆs desire to leave the ICU once hemodynamics had stabilized but there were multiple complex needs that might not be adequately addressed on a telemetry unit. In addition to increasing time spent with physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy, we formulated a "blended care approach" for nursing care. The critical care nurses paired with nurses on the telemetry unit so that the patient could stay out of the ICU and focus more on physical rehabilitation while his complex physical needs could continue to be addressed by a critical care nurse. Our goal was to foster learning, growth and teamwork while improving patient satisfaction, motivation and outcomes. Daily communication "huddles" were held to communicate and address concerns. The telemetry nurse was identified as the primary nurse with the experienced critical care as a mentor. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Although the device itself proved to be a remarkable replacement for the native heart, the patient suffered from an infection related to poor nutritional and respiratory states, ultimately passing away on postoperative day 69. However, the blended-care initiative was successful. The patient was kept out of the ICU for 18 days. The critical care staff expressed an increased sense of camaraderie and mentorship and the telemetry nurses increased their understanding of critical care workflow and advanced assessment techniques. The patient's family expressed how supported and respected they felt with the way our staff worked with the patient to improve his quality of life and potential for recovery.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIt Takes a Village: A Fully Implantable Heart Replacement Systemen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJoiner, Jenniferen_GB
dc.author.detailsJennifer Joiner, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA, email: jennifer.joiner@rwjuh.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157085-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Heart failure rates have risen disproportionately to heart transplants annually. Limited choices exist for biventricular failure patients ineligible for heart transplantation. A recently approved viable alternative is a fully implantable heart replacement system, that is, an artificial heart. Nursing care is as complex as the nature of heart failure itself. We developed a unique approach to patient management, advocating for the patient while retaining the proper level of care. DESCRIPTION: Patients with an artificial heart require an extensive aggressive multidisciplinary approach because of their baseline multisystem low flow state and physical debilitation before implant. We supported the patientÆs desire to leave the ICU once hemodynamics had stabilized but there were multiple complex needs that might not be adequately addressed on a telemetry unit. In addition to increasing time spent with physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy, we formulated a "blended care approach" for nursing care. The critical care nurses paired with nurses on the telemetry unit so that the patient could stay out of the ICU and focus more on physical rehabilitation while his complex physical needs could continue to be addressed by a critical care nurse. Our goal was to foster learning, growth and teamwork while improving patient satisfaction, motivation and outcomes. Daily communication "huddles" were held to communicate and address concerns. The telemetry nurse was identified as the primary nurse with the experienced critical care as a mentor. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Although the device itself proved to be a remarkable replacement for the native heart, the patient suffered from an infection related to poor nutritional and respiratory states, ultimately passing away on postoperative day 69. However, the blended-care initiative was successful. The patient was kept out of the ICU for 18 days. The critical care staff expressed an increased sense of camaraderie and mentorship and the telemetry nurses increased their understanding of critical care workflow and advanced assessment techniques. The patient's family expressed how supported and respected they felt with the way our staff worked with the patient to improve his quality of life and potential for recovery.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:24:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:24:29Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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