The Medical Assessment and Treatment Unit: Providing Timely Care for General Medical and Critical Care Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157087
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Medical Assessment and Treatment Unit: Providing Timely Care for General Medical and Critical Care Patients
Author(s):
Daly, Mary Lu; Dickinson, Tina
Author Details:
Mary Lu Daly, Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, New York, USA, email: tbase2@hughes.net; Tina Dickinson
Abstract:
PURPOSE: It has been all too common to have a disparity between patient needs and resources within busy hospitals operating at maximum capacity. The result has been that patients deemed to be candidates for admission linger in the ED. We have recently created the Medical Assessment and Treatment Unit (MATU) that goes above and beyond transitional care. The goal is to provide timely assessment and treatment to patients admitted, yet still awaiting an inpatient general medical or ICU bed. Description: Our solution has been to designate 'real estate' within the ED as the MATU and provide quality care upon arrival. Key components of this initiative included improving flow at the time the decision to admit is made, assigning patients to the right bed the first time, improving patient satisfaction and care, improving nurse and provider satisfaction, and decreasing length of stay. This collaborative process involved many changes. The Medical ICU (MICU) became "joined at the hip" with the MATU. Transitional beds in the ED were transferred to the MICU management team. Once fully operational, there were a total of 17 beds in the MATU including 6 ICU beds and 11 general medical beds. The staff composition of the MATU includes ICU nurses, general medical nurses, unlicensed assistive personnel, and around the clock secretarial support. All medical patients are filtered through the MATU, thus providing an opportunity for the nursing staff to fully assess each patient. The nursing staff collaborates with other healthcare team members to determine each patient's ultimate disposition. Patients may be treated and released, or transferred to medical or ICU beds as appropriate. EVALUATION: Although the MATU has been in operation less than a year, positive changes have been evident. Prompt treatment has, at times, resulted in patients being safely discharged home from the MATU, rather than experiencing a prolonged hospitalization. Patients originally designated for admission to ICU received earlier treatment and improved. They were then safe to be admitted to a general medical bed. Most patients that began their hospital admission in the MATU were sent to their designated hospital bed with admission orders transcribed and initiated. The result has been very positive to the units receiving these patients. Long-term analysis of benefits is underway.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Medical Assessment and Treatment Unit: Providing Timely Care for General Medical and Critical Care Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDaly, Mary Luen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDickinson, Tinaen_GB
dc.author.detailsMary Lu Daly, Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, New York, USA, email: tbase2@hughes.net; Tina Dickinsonen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157087-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: It has been all too common to have a disparity between patient needs and resources within busy hospitals operating at maximum capacity. The result has been that patients deemed to be candidates for admission linger in the ED. We have recently created the Medical Assessment and Treatment Unit (MATU) that goes above and beyond transitional care. The goal is to provide timely assessment and treatment to patients admitted, yet still awaiting an inpatient general medical or ICU bed. Description: Our solution has been to designate 'real estate' within the ED as the MATU and provide quality care upon arrival. Key components of this initiative included improving flow at the time the decision to admit is made, assigning patients to the right bed the first time, improving patient satisfaction and care, improving nurse and provider satisfaction, and decreasing length of stay. This collaborative process involved many changes. The Medical ICU (MICU) became "joined at the hip" with the MATU. Transitional beds in the ED were transferred to the MICU management team. Once fully operational, there were a total of 17 beds in the MATU including 6 ICU beds and 11 general medical beds. The staff composition of the MATU includes ICU nurses, general medical nurses, unlicensed assistive personnel, and around the clock secretarial support. All medical patients are filtered through the MATU, thus providing an opportunity for the nursing staff to fully assess each patient. The nursing staff collaborates with other healthcare team members to determine each patient's ultimate disposition. Patients may be treated and released, or transferred to medical or ICU beds as appropriate. EVALUATION: Although the MATU has been in operation less than a year, positive changes have been evident. Prompt treatment has, at times, resulted in patients being safely discharged home from the MATU, rather than experiencing a prolonged hospitalization. Patients originally designated for admission to ICU received earlier treatment and improved. They were then safe to be admitted to a general medical bed. Most patients that began their hospital admission in the MATU were sent to their designated hospital bed with admission orders transcribed and initiated. The result has been very positive to the units receiving these patients. Long-term analysis of benefits is underway.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:24:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:24:35Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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