2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157090
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Taking Orientation from Simulation to Reality
Author(s):
Davis, Janis; McBroom, Kathryn
Author Details:
Janice Davis, Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: jld1diva@nc.rr.com; Kathryn McBroom
Abstract:
PURPOSE: During the past year, 75% of RN hires on our progressive care unit were new graduates. During orientation we realized that the level of anxiety in the new nurse was a barrier to learning in the reality of patient care. In order to maximize the orientation experience, we decided we needed to nurture the nurse to help transition them from simulation to reality. Description: Following an influx of new graduate nurses to our 31 bed step-down unit, the Unit Orientation Coordinator scheduled each new graduate nurse a 2 hour block of time in the Simulation Suite with the lab's educational trainer. We wanted the new nurses orientation phase to include opportunities in which they would be better prepared and thus, more confident in the provision of nursing care. While integrating nursing skills, knowledge and judgment, they were challenged with multiple "hands-on" clinical scenarios which involved the simulation manikin, SimMan. SimMan could introduce practical patient care to the new graduate nurses without the stress that sometimes accompanies their first exposure to actual patient care situations. Utilizing SimMan, the new nurses performed head-to-toe assessments, placed intravenous lines, inserted Foley catheters, assessed cardiac telemetry, and participated in cardiac arrest episodes. EVALUATION: As a result of our Simulation Suite excursion during the initial orientation period to our unit, the new graduate nurses conveyed that the "hands-on" experience with the SimMan highlighted the skills they received from nursing school, as well as provided them with new invaluable nursing competencies needed for our unit. They felt more confident with their provision of nursing care and the potential critical events that may occur with our patient population. The new nurses demonstrated that through simulation, they were better able to retain the information provided during the remainder of orientation as evidenced by their ability to safely and effectively manage real patient events.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTaking Orientation from Simulation to Realityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Janisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcBroom, Kathrynen_GB
dc.author.detailsJanice Davis, Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: jld1diva@nc.rr.com; Kathryn McBroomen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157090-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: During the past year, 75% of RN hires on our progressive care unit were new graduates. During orientation we realized that the level of anxiety in the new nurse was a barrier to learning in the reality of patient care. In order to maximize the orientation experience, we decided we needed to nurture the nurse to help transition them from simulation to reality. Description: Following an influx of new graduate nurses to our 31 bed step-down unit, the Unit Orientation Coordinator scheduled each new graduate nurse a 2 hour block of time in the Simulation Suite with the lab's educational trainer. We wanted the new nurses orientation phase to include opportunities in which they would be better prepared and thus, more confident in the provision of nursing care. While integrating nursing skills, knowledge and judgment, they were challenged with multiple "hands-on" clinical scenarios which involved the simulation manikin, SimMan. SimMan could introduce practical patient care to the new graduate nurses without the stress that sometimes accompanies their first exposure to actual patient care situations. Utilizing SimMan, the new nurses performed head-to-toe assessments, placed intravenous lines, inserted Foley catheters, assessed cardiac telemetry, and participated in cardiac arrest episodes. EVALUATION: As a result of our Simulation Suite excursion during the initial orientation period to our unit, the new graduate nurses conveyed that the "hands-on" experience with the SimMan highlighted the skills they received from nursing school, as well as provided them with new invaluable nursing competencies needed for our unit. They felt more confident with their provision of nursing care and the potential critical events that may occur with our patient population. The new nurses demonstrated that through simulation, they were better able to retain the information provided during the remainder of orientation as evidenced by their ability to safely and effectively manage real patient events.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:24:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:24:45Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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