Induced Hypothermia Post-Cardiac Arrest: Finding a Non-invasive Solution, Developing the Protocol and Tracking Success

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157092
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Induced Hypothermia Post-Cardiac Arrest: Finding a Non-invasive Solution, Developing the Protocol and Tracking Success
Author(s):
Deckard, Michelle; Tackitt, Jan
Author Details:
Michelle Deckard, Clarian Health- Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: mdeckard@clarian.org; Jan Tackitt
Abstract:
PURPOSE: To make the practice of Induced Hypothermia Post- Cardiac Arrest as efficient as possible, and do it without using invasive techniques. To track the process and outcome measures associated with the therapy and identify areas for improvement. Description: We researched the market for available noninvasive options to induce hypothermia. A database was developed to track process and outcome measures. Initial education was completed by a company representative. A specific competency-based education program was developed and staff nurses were trained to facilitate the education. Protocol order sets were written and revised several times as problems in the process were identified. The emergency room staff were included in the education so that hypothermia could be initiated soon after arrival to the hospital. EVALUATION: The time from initiation of therapy to the target temperature decreased significantly with use of new equipment and protocol. Maintaining the target temperature was accomplished efficiently with the new equipment and protocol. Re-warming was easily controlled with new equipment and protocol. We have had tremendous success with the use of the new Hypothermia Protocol. Of the 41 patients that we have initiated the therapy on, 33% have survived and been discharged with a GCS of 14 or greater! In those patients who have presented with VT/VF as an initial cardiac rhythm, our survival rate has been 52%(11/21). The survival rate in patients with PEA or Asystole has been 20% (6/30).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInduced Hypothermia Post-Cardiac Arrest: Finding a Non-invasive Solution, Developing the Protocol and Tracking Successen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDeckard, Michelleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTackitt, Janen_GB
dc.author.detailsMichelle Deckard, Clarian Health- Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: mdeckard@clarian.org; Jan Tackitten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157092-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To make the practice of Induced Hypothermia Post- Cardiac Arrest as efficient as possible, and do it without using invasive techniques. To track the process and outcome measures associated with the therapy and identify areas for improvement. Description: We researched the market for available noninvasive options to induce hypothermia. A database was developed to track process and outcome measures. Initial education was completed by a company representative. A specific competency-based education program was developed and staff nurses were trained to facilitate the education. Protocol order sets were written and revised several times as problems in the process were identified. The emergency room staff were included in the education so that hypothermia could be initiated soon after arrival to the hospital. EVALUATION: The time from initiation of therapy to the target temperature decreased significantly with use of new equipment and protocol. Maintaining the target temperature was accomplished efficiently with the new equipment and protocol. Re-warming was easily controlled with new equipment and protocol. We have had tremendous success with the use of the new Hypothermia Protocol. Of the 41 patients that we have initiated the therapy on, 33% have survived and been discharged with a GCS of 14 or greater! In those patients who have presented with VT/VF as an initial cardiac rhythm, our survival rate has been 52%(11/21). The survival rate in patients with PEA or Asystole has been 20% (6/30).en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:24:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:24:52Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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