2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157097
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pressure Ulcer Prevention in High-Risk Post-Operative Cardiovascular Surgery Patients
Author(s):
Drumm, Jennifer; Merrick, Brian; Jackson, Melissa; Lemaster, Tamara; McKenney, Teresa; Vangilder, Catherine
Author Details:
Jennifer Drumm, St. Joseph Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, email: jenniferdrumm@sjhlex.org; Brian Merrick; Melissa Jackson; Tamara Lemaster; Teresa McKenney; Catherine Vangilder
Abstract:
PURPOSE: There is a lack of evidence in the literature as to how to prevent pressure ulcers in the severely debilitated, immobile ICU patient. This study presents a possible prevention strategy for these very sick patients. The post-operative cardiovascular surgery patient is at high risk for developing pressure ulcers as they have decreased tissue perfusion resulting from hypotension, shock, or dehydration. Also they are immobile due to sedatives or paralytics, have poor nutrition, and incontinence. Description: In the St. Joseph's CTVU, a retrospective analysis of patients who developed pressure ulcers revealed that these patients had high doses, and a variety of vasopressor orders; they received multiple blood products in the operating room prior to skin breakdown, and they were mechanically ventilated post-operatively. The skin breakdown rate was approximately 10% in this unit, and patients commonly developed quite severe pressure ulcers. In an effort to prevent pressure ulcer development the CTVU staff chose to implement air fluidized therapy (AFT) beds which provide maximal emersion and envelopment as a pressure ulcer prevention measure for patients who: 1) Required vasopressors for at least 24 hours, and 2) Required mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours post operatively. Evaluation and Outcomes: The results of this implementation have been extremely positive during the last 7 months that the program has been in place (February 2008 through August 2008). Only 1 patient out of 27 patients developing a pressure ulcer while on the AFT bed, and this ulcer was only a Stage I. Patients spent an average of 7.9 days on the mattress and the cost of bed rental was approximately $18,000, which compared to the costs of treatment of even one Stage III or IV pressure ulcer (estimated ~ $40,000 in the literature) was considered cost effective. We are currently developing further efforts to expand this high risk pressure ulcer prevention program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePressure Ulcer Prevention in High-Risk Post-Operative Cardiovascular Surgery Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDrumm, Jenniferen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMerrick, Brianen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Melissaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLemaster, Tamaraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcKenney, Teresaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVangilder, Catherineen_GB
dc.author.detailsJennifer Drumm, St. Joseph Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, email: jenniferdrumm@sjhlex.org; Brian Merrick; Melissa Jackson; Tamara Lemaster; Teresa McKenney; Catherine Vangilderen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157097-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: There is a lack of evidence in the literature as to how to prevent pressure ulcers in the severely debilitated, immobile ICU patient. This study presents a possible prevention strategy for these very sick patients. The post-operative cardiovascular surgery patient is at high risk for developing pressure ulcers as they have decreased tissue perfusion resulting from hypotension, shock, or dehydration. Also they are immobile due to sedatives or paralytics, have poor nutrition, and incontinence. Description: In the St. Joseph's CTVU, a retrospective analysis of patients who developed pressure ulcers revealed that these patients had high doses, and a variety of vasopressor orders; they received multiple blood products in the operating room prior to skin breakdown, and they were mechanically ventilated post-operatively. The skin breakdown rate was approximately 10% in this unit, and patients commonly developed quite severe pressure ulcers. In an effort to prevent pressure ulcer development the CTVU staff chose to implement air fluidized therapy (AFT) beds which provide maximal emersion and envelopment as a pressure ulcer prevention measure for patients who: 1) Required vasopressors for at least 24 hours, and 2) Required mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours post operatively. Evaluation and Outcomes: The results of this implementation have been extremely positive during the last 7 months that the program has been in place (February 2008 through August 2008). Only 1 patient out of 27 patients developing a pressure ulcer while on the AFT bed, and this ulcer was only a Stage I. Patients spent an average of 7.9 days on the mattress and the cost of bed rental was approximately $18,000, which compared to the costs of treatment of even one Stage III or IV pressure ulcer (estimated ~ $40,000 in the literature) was considered cost effective. We are currently developing further efforts to expand this high risk pressure ulcer prevention program.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:25:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:25:05Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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