Mentoring beyond Structured Orientation: Simulation-Based Education to Enhance Critical Thinking Skills

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157101
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mentoring beyond Structured Orientation: Simulation-Based Education to Enhance Critical Thinking Skills
Author(s):
Faldet, Jody; Haala, Pam
Author Details:
Jody Faldet, Rochester Methodist Hospital, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, email: jlfaldet@iowatelecom.net; Pam Haala
Abstract:
PURPOSE: To provide an educational opportunity for nurses post orientation to practice critical thinking skills in a simulation environment and foster continued advancement in bedside vigilance and safety in patient care. Description: Our unit-based preceptor committee has developed a follow-up class for new nurses approximately 6-9 months after completion of the formal critical care orientation. The critical care orientation provides a strong knowledge base but the challenge for preceptors is to facilitate the integration of that information in the dynamic ICU environment. The class focuses on hemodynamic review and utilizes simulation-based learning at our facility's simulation center. The selected critical care scenarios have been an effective way to expose new staff to situations that frequently occur in our specialty ICU. It provides opportunities to observe behavior under stress, intervene for learning or to allow mistakes to be made without jeopardizing patient safety. Over time the scenarios have changed to accommodate the newest practices on our specialty intensive care unit. We are able to evaluate how orientation prepared new staff for our environment and challenge them to broaden their individual view of the situations simulated. EVALUATION: We believe simulation-based learning promotes higher level integration of specialty information, enabling more effective learning and patient care. Participants complete a survey after going through the simulation sessions to evaluate the class and to suggest possible improvements. Our preceptor group and leadership have validated the benefit of the class. We plan to continue to use this type to education to further support and empower our new colleagues.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMentoring beyond Structured Orientation: Simulation-Based Education to Enhance Critical Thinking Skillsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFaldet, Jodyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHaala, Pamen_GB
dc.author.detailsJody Faldet, Rochester Methodist Hospital, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, email: jlfaldet@iowatelecom.net; Pam Haalaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157101-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To provide an educational opportunity for nurses post orientation to practice critical thinking skills in a simulation environment and foster continued advancement in bedside vigilance and safety in patient care. Description: Our unit-based preceptor committee has developed a follow-up class for new nurses approximately 6-9 months after completion of the formal critical care orientation. The critical care orientation provides a strong knowledge base but the challenge for preceptors is to facilitate the integration of that information in the dynamic ICU environment. The class focuses on hemodynamic review and utilizes simulation-based learning at our facility's simulation center. The selected critical care scenarios have been an effective way to expose new staff to situations that frequently occur in our specialty ICU. It provides opportunities to observe behavior under stress, intervene for learning or to allow mistakes to be made without jeopardizing patient safety. Over time the scenarios have changed to accommodate the newest practices on our specialty intensive care unit. We are able to evaluate how orientation prepared new staff for our environment and challenge them to broaden their individual view of the situations simulated. EVALUATION: We believe simulation-based learning promotes higher level integration of specialty information, enabling more effective learning and patient care. Participants complete a survey after going through the simulation sessions to evaluate the class and to suggest possible improvements. Our preceptor group and leadership have validated the benefit of the class. We plan to continue to use this type to education to further support and empower our new colleagues.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:25:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:25:19Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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