2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157102
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Oral Care Practices Survey for the Orally Intubated Adult Critically Ill Patient
Author(s):
Feider, Laura; Mitchell, Pamela; Loan, Lori; Gallucci, Betty; Bridges, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Laura Feider, Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, Washington, USA, email: laura.feider@amedd.army.mil; Pamela Mitchell; Lori Loan; Betty Gallucci; Elizabeth Bridges
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The purpose of this research was to describe oral care practices performed by critical care nurses for orally intubated critically ill patients and compare these practices with the 2005 AACN Procedure Manual for Critical Care and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations for oral care. This study was conducted to describe oral care practices performed by critical care nurses for orally intubated critically ill patients. BACKGROUND: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) represents a major threat to all mechanically ventilated patients. Oral care is one nursing intervention that targets VAP prevention. Oral care policies and practices vary from state to state, hospital to hospital, and even within intensive care units. Protocols guiding oral care may be inconsistent, impractical or difficult to follow. The primary goal of oral care is to promote oral hygiene, and thereby decrease oropharynx colonization, dental plaque colonization, and aspiration of colonized saliva. METHODS: A descriptive, cross-sectional design with a web-based survey was used to describe oral care practices reported by critical care nurses. The sampling target included any registered nurse who was a current 2006-2007 member of the AACN and was working in an adult critical care unit in the United States. A valid and reliable web-based survey was created using face validity, content validity (97%), and test-retest reliability measures (r = 0.70-0.92). Dillman's survey methodology was used. Three hundred forty-seven (17% response rate) randomly selected members of the AACN membership completed a 31-item web-based survey of oral care practices from November 1, 2006 to January 5, 2007. RESULTS: Oral care was performed every 2 (50%) or 4 hours (42%), most commonly using foam swabs (97%). Oral care was reported as a high priority (47%). Nurses with greater than 7 years of critical care experience performed oral care significantly more frequently (p = 0.008) than those with less than 7 years. Nurses with a BSN used foam swabs (p = 0.001), suctioned before ETT suctioning (p = 0.02), and suctioned after oral care (p < 0.000) more frequently when compared to associate degree and diploma prepared nurses. Nurses whose ICUs had an oral care policy (72%) reported that it stated using a toothbrush (48%), using toothpaste (32%), brushing with a foam swab (64%), using chlorhexidine gluconate oral rinse (38%), suctioning the oral cavity (70%), and assessing the oral cavity (60%). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first national critical care nurse survey of oral care practices using the AACN membership database. Additionally, this study compared reported practices against recommended practices and against the AACN/CDC recommendations. Results of this nation-wide survey indicate that discrepancies exist between reported practices and policies. Oral care policies appear to be present, but not well utilized. Performing oral care is an essential nursing strategy for VAP prevention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOral Care Practices Survey for the Orally Intubated Adult Critically Ill Patienten_GB
dc.contributor.authorFeider, Lauraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Pamelaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLoan, Lorien_GB
dc.contributor.authorGallucci, Bettyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBridges, Elizabethen_GB
dc.author.detailsLaura Feider, Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, Washington, USA, email: laura.feider@amedd.army.mil; Pamela Mitchell; Lori Loan; Betty Gallucci; Elizabeth Bridgesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157102-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The purpose of this research was to describe oral care practices performed by critical care nurses for orally intubated critically ill patients and compare these practices with the 2005 AACN Procedure Manual for Critical Care and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations for oral care. This study was conducted to describe oral care practices performed by critical care nurses for orally intubated critically ill patients. BACKGROUND: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) represents a major threat to all mechanically ventilated patients. Oral care is one nursing intervention that targets VAP prevention. Oral care policies and practices vary from state to state, hospital to hospital, and even within intensive care units. Protocols guiding oral care may be inconsistent, impractical or difficult to follow. The primary goal of oral care is to promote oral hygiene, and thereby decrease oropharynx colonization, dental plaque colonization, and aspiration of colonized saliva. METHODS: A descriptive, cross-sectional design with a web-based survey was used to describe oral care practices reported by critical care nurses. The sampling target included any registered nurse who was a current 2006-2007 member of the AACN and was working in an adult critical care unit in the United States. A valid and reliable web-based survey was created using face validity, content validity (97%), and test-retest reliability measures (r = 0.70-0.92). Dillman's survey methodology was used. Three hundred forty-seven (17% response rate) randomly selected members of the AACN membership completed a 31-item web-based survey of oral care practices from November 1, 2006 to January 5, 2007. RESULTS: Oral care was performed every 2 (50%) or 4 hours (42%), most commonly using foam swabs (97%). Oral care was reported as a high priority (47%). Nurses with greater than 7 years of critical care experience performed oral care significantly more frequently (p = 0.008) than those with less than 7 years. Nurses with a BSN used foam swabs (p = 0.001), suctioned before ETT suctioning (p = 0.02), and suctioned after oral care (p < 0.000) more frequently when compared to associate degree and diploma prepared nurses. Nurses whose ICUs had an oral care policy (72%) reported that it stated using a toothbrush (48%), using toothpaste (32%), brushing with a foam swab (64%), using chlorhexidine gluconate oral rinse (38%), suctioning the oral cavity (70%), and assessing the oral cavity (60%). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first national critical care nurse survey of oral care practices using the AACN membership database. Additionally, this study compared reported practices against recommended practices and against the AACN/CDC recommendations. Results of this nation-wide survey indicate that discrepancies exist between reported practices and policies. Oral care policies appear to be present, but not well utilized. Performing oral care is an essential nursing strategy for VAP prevention.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:25:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:25:22Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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