2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157106
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Universal Violence Precautions to Manage Violence from Patients and Visitors
Author(s):
Gillespie, Gordon; Howard, Patricia Kunz; Gates, Donna M.; Miller, Margaret
Author Details:
Gordon Gillespie, University of Cincinnati College of Nursing, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, email: gordon.gillespie@uc.edu; Patricia Kunz Howard; Donna Gates; Margaret Miller
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe the prevention and management of workplace violence that occurs in a pediatric emergency department (ED). Two aims of this study were: (1) identify strategies to prevent the occurrence of workplace violence against healthcare workers in a pediatric ED and (2) identify strategies that could be implemented to provide support to the worker during or immediately following a violent event when the worker is the target of patient or visitor violence. BACKGROUND: Workplace violence is four times more likely to occur in a healthcare setting than in all private industry combined. Although workplace violence in the ED setting has been recognized for a number of years, there have been no studies depicting best practice to manage violent events from the ED worker perspective. As a result, it was important to study the problem of workplace violence against ED workers using qualitative interviews to explore potential solutions. METHODS: Interviews were conducted individually with 31 workers (physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, child life specialists, paramedics, and patient care attendants) in a Midwestern pediatric ED. Interviews were transcribed verbatim yielding 690 pages of transcripts. Interview data were analyzed using a modified constant comparative analysis method. In an effort to triangulate the interview data, 40 hours of direct observations were conducted in addition to analyzing 499 organizational policies, all educational opportunities, intranet announcements, and intranet news stories over an 18 month period. RESULTS: Intervention strategies were identified at the primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention levels. Primary intervention strategies included better control of visitor access to treatment areas and mandating training to all ED direct care providers. Secondary intervention strategies included using de-escalation techniques, setting limits on unacceptable behaviors, and intervening when necessary to stop violent events. Tertiary intervention strategies included providing self-care, holding informal debriefings, taking a break, attending to any physical injuries of the patient or workers, completing safety event reports, and for extreme violence filing police reports. CONCLUSIONS: ED workers are knowledgeable regarding intervention strategies that may reduce the number of violent events as well as moderate the negative effects for ED workers who experience violent events. Research is needed to test the effectiveness of the strategies. To increase the chance for success it is important that bedside caregivers be involved in both the development and implementation of those strategies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUniversal Violence Precautions to Manage Violence from Patients and Visitorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGillespie, Gordonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Patricia Kunzen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGates, Donna M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Margareten_GB
dc.author.detailsGordon Gillespie, University of Cincinnati College of Nursing, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, email: gordon.gillespie@uc.edu; Patricia Kunz Howard; Donna Gates; Margaret Milleren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157106-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe the prevention and management of workplace violence that occurs in a pediatric emergency department (ED). Two aims of this study were: (1) identify strategies to prevent the occurrence of workplace violence against healthcare workers in a pediatric ED and (2) identify strategies that could be implemented to provide support to the worker during or immediately following a violent event when the worker is the target of patient or visitor violence. BACKGROUND: Workplace violence is four times more likely to occur in a healthcare setting than in all private industry combined. Although workplace violence in the ED setting has been recognized for a number of years, there have been no studies depicting best practice to manage violent events from the ED worker perspective. As a result, it was important to study the problem of workplace violence against ED workers using qualitative interviews to explore potential solutions. METHODS: Interviews were conducted individually with 31 workers (physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, child life specialists, paramedics, and patient care attendants) in a Midwestern pediatric ED. Interviews were transcribed verbatim yielding 690 pages of transcripts. Interview data were analyzed using a modified constant comparative analysis method. In an effort to triangulate the interview data, 40 hours of direct observations were conducted in addition to analyzing 499 organizational policies, all educational opportunities, intranet announcements, and intranet news stories over an 18 month period. RESULTS: Intervention strategies were identified at the primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention levels. Primary intervention strategies included better control of visitor access to treatment areas and mandating training to all ED direct care providers. Secondary intervention strategies included using de-escalation techniques, setting limits on unacceptable behaviors, and intervening when necessary to stop violent events. Tertiary intervention strategies included providing self-care, holding informal debriefings, taking a break, attending to any physical injuries of the patient or workers, completing safety event reports, and for extreme violence filing police reports. CONCLUSIONS: ED workers are knowledgeable regarding intervention strategies that may reduce the number of violent events as well as moderate the negative effects for ED workers who experience violent events. Research is needed to test the effectiveness of the strategies. To increase the chance for success it is important that bedside caregivers be involved in both the development and implementation of those strategies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:25:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:25:35Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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