Assuming Command: Using Simulation Training to Develop Leadership Skills for Resuscitation and Critical Care Transport

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157111
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assuming Command: Using Simulation Training to Develop Leadership Skills for Resuscitation and Critical Care Transport
Author(s):
Hallinan, William; Macintyre, John; Stalica, Larry
Author Details:
William Hallinan, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA, email: william_hallinan@urmc.rochester.edu; John Macintyre; Larry Stalica
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Leadership skills are often a challenge to create and mentor in nurses who are transitioning from a bedside role to one of leadership. Additionally, these team command skills are required to function flawlessly during high acuity events such and patient resuscitations and critical care transport. The purpose of this project was to combine the mature technology of patient simulation and the knowledge base of leadership experts to create a training process to develop and test the leadership and command skills of critical care nurses. Description: A group was created to develop a curriculum for the training of nurses who would be in the role of commanding events during periods of crisis or high risk. The curriculum developed reflects the diverse scope of leadership including interpersonal communication, critical thinking, organizational skills, and development of strategy and tactics. The didactic training was combined with an intensive simulation experience on high acuity patients in crisis. This experience allows attendees to practice communication and leadership skills with interdisciplinary teams of health care members. The simulation activities require learners to overcome the potential chaos and bring order and control to situations though various leadership strategies. Team members from hybrid transport teams are required to attend the class prior to working together in real world transports. Participants develop skill sets to return to patient care areas to create team creation and discipline needed to have successful teams. EVALUATION: The course has progressed into the Medical Events Command Course (MECC) that is offered regularly to critical care transport teams, nurses, and physicians. The simulation component now includes simulated surgical scenarios using bovine hearts. Additionally, the course includes the using the National Incident Management System (NIMS) for table top simulation of larger scale events.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssuming Command: Using Simulation Training to Develop Leadership Skills for Resuscitation and Critical Care Transporten_GB
dc.contributor.authorHallinan, Williamen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMacintyre, Johnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStalica, Larryen_GB
dc.author.detailsWilliam Hallinan, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA, email: william_hallinan@urmc.rochester.edu; John Macintyre; Larry Stalicaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157111-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Leadership skills are often a challenge to create and mentor in nurses who are transitioning from a bedside role to one of leadership. Additionally, these team command skills are required to function flawlessly during high acuity events such and patient resuscitations and critical care transport. The purpose of this project was to combine the mature technology of patient simulation and the knowledge base of leadership experts to create a training process to develop and test the leadership and command skills of critical care nurses. Description: A group was created to develop a curriculum for the training of nurses who would be in the role of commanding events during periods of crisis or high risk. The curriculum developed reflects the diverse scope of leadership including interpersonal communication, critical thinking, organizational skills, and development of strategy and tactics. The didactic training was combined with an intensive simulation experience on high acuity patients in crisis. This experience allows attendees to practice communication and leadership skills with interdisciplinary teams of health care members. The simulation activities require learners to overcome the potential chaos and bring order and control to situations though various leadership strategies. Team members from hybrid transport teams are required to attend the class prior to working together in real world transports. Participants develop skill sets to return to patient care areas to create team creation and discipline needed to have successful teams. EVALUATION: The course has progressed into the Medical Events Command Course (MECC) that is offered regularly to critical care transport teams, nurses, and physicians. The simulation component now includes simulated surgical scenarios using bovine hearts. Additionally, the course includes the using the National Incident Management System (NIMS) for table top simulation of larger scale events.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:25:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:25:51Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.