2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157113
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preserving Cognition in the Critically Ill: Our Educational Path to Improving Outcome
Author(s):
Harner, Alicia
Author Details:
Alicia Harner, Tampa General Hospital, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: aharner@tgh.org
Abstract:
PURPOSE: In the ICU a majority of our patients are mechanically ventilated. Many of these patients, and others who were critically ill yet did not require ventilatory assistance showed signs of confusion and cognitive impairment. Research of recent studies led us to the CAM-ICU tool. It was our hope that use of this tool in our clinical assessment and therapy would improve outcomes for our very ill patients. Description: Implementation of the CAM-ICU in a hospital as large as ours would be a great undertaking. Nursing and pharmacy met several times to discuss method, content, education, and how to move forward in a timely way. Several calls were made to Vanderbilt University Medical Center to discuss their successful use of the CAM-ICU tool. Their help and willingness to share with us was welcomed. A policy was completed and work was begun. Nurse Managers of all our ICU's selected staff members to be super-users who would assist in training the remainder of the staff. A committee member was chosen to design a training packet and educate the super-users. Again with the help of Vanderbilt, a complete educational plan was completed and training began. The actual training process is not quick as each person has to read the information, learn how to do the assessment, how to present the findings to the physician, and to know the appropriate therapy. The assessment must be done in the presence of the trainer, and a short post-test is given. The actual training of all staff took slightly over a year. EVALUATION: We have educated over 450 nurses, and 150 nurses in our critical care program. During this time we opened a critical care wing and a Vascular ICU that required additional training. We have added the CAM-ICU training to our orientation program to ensure all new nurses are trained. The assessment has been added to our flow sheet and is checked randomly to assess compliance. The pharmacy established a protocol for sedation of mechanically ventilated patients that includes treatment for agitation and confusion when other methods of treatment have not had the desired outcome. We feel that we are doing all that is possible to prevent cognitive impairment in our critically patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreserving Cognition in the Critically Ill: Our Educational Path to Improving Outcomeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHarner, Aliciaen_GB
dc.author.detailsAlicia Harner, Tampa General Hospital, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: aharner@tgh.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157113-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: In the ICU a majority of our patients are mechanically ventilated. Many of these patients, and others who were critically ill yet did not require ventilatory assistance showed signs of confusion and cognitive impairment. Research of recent studies led us to the CAM-ICU tool. It was our hope that use of this tool in our clinical assessment and therapy would improve outcomes for our very ill patients. Description: Implementation of the CAM-ICU in a hospital as large as ours would be a great undertaking. Nursing and pharmacy met several times to discuss method, content, education, and how to move forward in a timely way. Several calls were made to Vanderbilt University Medical Center to discuss their successful use of the CAM-ICU tool. Their help and willingness to share with us was welcomed. A policy was completed and work was begun. Nurse Managers of all our ICU's selected staff members to be super-users who would assist in training the remainder of the staff. A committee member was chosen to design a training packet and educate the super-users. Again with the help of Vanderbilt, a complete educational plan was completed and training began. The actual training process is not quick as each person has to read the information, learn how to do the assessment, how to present the findings to the physician, and to know the appropriate therapy. The assessment must be done in the presence of the trainer, and a short post-test is given. The actual training of all staff took slightly over a year. EVALUATION: We have educated over 450 nurses, and 150 nurses in our critical care program. During this time we opened a critical care wing and a Vascular ICU that required additional training. We have added the CAM-ICU training to our orientation program to ensure all new nurses are trained. The assessment has been added to our flow sheet and is checked randomly to assess compliance. The pharmacy established a protocol for sedation of mechanically ventilated patients that includes treatment for agitation and confusion when other methods of treatment have not had the desired outcome. We feel that we are doing all that is possible to prevent cognitive impairment in our critically patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:25:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:25:58Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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