Charge Nurse Alerts: A Tool for the New Critical Care Nurse to Enhance Communication, Performance and Safety

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157114
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Charge Nurse Alerts: A Tool for the New Critical Care Nurse to Enhance Communication, Performance and Safety
Author(s):
Healey, Lawrence; Everett, Brenda
Author Details:
Lawrence Healey, Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: healey@u.washington.edu; Brenda Everett
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Our Neuroscience ICU is expanding from 10 to 30 beds. Expansion of this magnitude required us to open our hiring to greater numbers of inexperienced ICU RNs and new graduates. Having an ICU that is comprised of many nurses who have no previous ICU experience is a big challenge since they require continued support and guidance after their training period. We decided we needed to develop a plan to enhance safety, encourage communication, and create a framework for continuing education. Description: Orientation consisted of an ICU consortium or Essentials of Critical Care Orientation (ECCO) and clinical training with an experienced ICU nurse. Despite demonstrating competence, we began to find errors in judgment once the new RN was working independently. We puzzled over how to support the nurses and promote critical thinking and safe patient care. We surveyed the nurses to evaluate perceptions related to confidence, clinical skill, and safety. The surveys confirmed new RNs could benefit from and be open to additional support. By adopting the Rapid Response model that is used nationwide, we modified our hospital's triggers to guide our RNAE assessments, provide early intervention and avoid complications. We designed "Charge Nurse Alerts", which encompass all body systems, lab and other diagnostic abnormalities. Some examples are confusion, uncontrolled HTN, increased O2 needs, and an intuition or gut feeling that something is not right. The alerts are printed on cards and worn with our ID badges for easy reference. When a nurse identifies an alert, they communicate this with the charge nurse and together they evaluate the patient. These cards and this interaction enhance safety, communication and support continuing education. EVALUATION: The response to the "Charge Nurse Alerts" program has been overwhelming positive. Many nurses began using the new resource immediately. Other nurses needed to familiarize themselves with the process to use the tool more effectively. The charge nurses began to model the card's use by interacting with nurses in patient's rooms by simply reviewing the triggers and encouraging questions. Now, most nurses are routinely referring to the cards and requesting input at the bedside. In addition, several other units within the hospital have expressed interest and are eager to implement the program in their own areas.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharge Nurse Alerts: A Tool for the New Critical Care Nurse to Enhance Communication, Performance and Safetyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHealey, Lawrenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEverett, Brendaen_GB
dc.author.detailsLawrence Healey, Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: healey@u.washington.edu; Brenda Everetten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157114-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Our Neuroscience ICU is expanding from 10 to 30 beds. Expansion of this magnitude required us to open our hiring to greater numbers of inexperienced ICU RNs and new graduates. Having an ICU that is comprised of many nurses who have no previous ICU experience is a big challenge since they require continued support and guidance after their training period. We decided we needed to develop a plan to enhance safety, encourage communication, and create a framework for continuing education. Description: Orientation consisted of an ICU consortium or Essentials of Critical Care Orientation (ECCO) and clinical training with an experienced ICU nurse. Despite demonstrating competence, we began to find errors in judgment once the new RN was working independently. We puzzled over how to support the nurses and promote critical thinking and safe patient care. We surveyed the nurses to evaluate perceptions related to confidence, clinical skill, and safety. The surveys confirmed new RNs could benefit from and be open to additional support. By adopting the Rapid Response model that is used nationwide, we modified our hospital's triggers to guide our RNAE assessments, provide early intervention and avoid complications. We designed "Charge Nurse Alerts", which encompass all body systems, lab and other diagnostic abnormalities. Some examples are confusion, uncontrolled HTN, increased O2 needs, and an intuition or gut feeling that something is not right. The alerts are printed on cards and worn with our ID badges for easy reference. When a nurse identifies an alert, they communicate this with the charge nurse and together they evaluate the patient. These cards and this interaction enhance safety, communication and support continuing education. EVALUATION: The response to the "Charge Nurse Alerts" program has been overwhelming positive. Many nurses began using the new resource immediately. Other nurses needed to familiarize themselves with the process to use the tool more effectively. The charge nurses began to model the card's use by interacting with nurses in patient's rooms by simply reviewing the triggers and encouraging questions. Now, most nurses are routinely referring to the cards and requesting input at the bedside. In addition, several other units within the hospital have expressed interest and are eager to implement the program in their own areas.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:26:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:26:01Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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