Kick the Fluff - Let's Standardize: A Standardized Approach to Pediatric Parenteral Medication Delivery

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157119
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Kick the Fluff - Let's Standardize: A Standardized Approach to Pediatric Parenteral Medication Delivery
Author(s):
Idea, Tess
Author Details:
Tess Idea, The Children's Cancer Hospital of M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: tessidea@aol.com
Abstract:
PURPOSE: To evaluate the best practice in parenteral medication delivery process among pediatric institutions in the country. Delivering medications safely to hospitalized pediatric patients presents a significant challenge as there are wide variations in patientÆs weight and drug dose. Critically ill children pose a unique challenge because they require fluid restrictions. Variability in the delivery of medications is inherently unsafe. Current JCAO standards require safe medication practices, including Description: We embarked on an evidence-based project to standardize the volume of flushes given after infusion of intravenous medication in order to provide accurate drug dosage necessary for our patients. A literature review on the topic of "flushing after parenteral delivery of medications" resulted in no available publications related to this subject. The search was then conducted through list-serves and interviews with the clinical nurses and nurse specialists from various pediatric institutions in the country. After reviewing evidence based practices and benchmark evaluations of the top ten pediatric hospitals in the nation, the Children's Cancer Hospital of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center developed a practice guidelines in administering parenteral medications. The fundamental process is as follows: 1) Pharmacy will not dispense overfill medications; 2) A 2 ml normal saline flush will be given after the medication is infused if a drug is delivered via syringe pump, and a 20 ml of normal saline flush if the medication is administered via regular infusion pump; 3) The use of injection ports proximally located next to intravenous (IV) insertion site is ideal; 4) The nursing staff will continue to use mechanical infusion devices to deliver IV medications and continue use of microbore IV tubing with small intraluminal diameter. EVALUATION: A special policy and procedure on intravenous drug delivery in PICU will be presented for approval to the Nursing Policy and Procedure Committee. Compliance with the procedure will be evaluated six months after implementation using a standardized tool. Pharmacokinetics study will be conducted to evaluate accuracy in drug delivery. This guideline will reduce variability in practice, simplify the delivery of parenteral medications, and prevent medication errors. The clinical nurses in our PICU were gratified with the empowerment provided to them with this practice change.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKick the Fluff - Let's Standardize: A Standardized Approach to Pediatric Parenteral Medication Deliveryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIdea, Tessen_GB
dc.author.detailsTess Idea, The Children's Cancer Hospital of M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: tessidea@aol.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157119-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To evaluate the best practice in parenteral medication delivery process among pediatric institutions in the country. Delivering medications safely to hospitalized pediatric patients presents a significant challenge as there are wide variations in patientÆs weight and drug dose. Critically ill children pose a unique challenge because they require fluid restrictions. Variability in the delivery of medications is inherently unsafe. Current JCAO standards require safe medication practices, including Description: We embarked on an evidence-based project to standardize the volume of flushes given after infusion of intravenous medication in order to provide accurate drug dosage necessary for our patients. A literature review on the topic of "flushing after parenteral delivery of medications" resulted in no available publications related to this subject. The search was then conducted through list-serves and interviews with the clinical nurses and nurse specialists from various pediatric institutions in the country. After reviewing evidence based practices and benchmark evaluations of the top ten pediatric hospitals in the nation, the Children's Cancer Hospital of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center developed a practice guidelines in administering parenteral medications. The fundamental process is as follows: 1) Pharmacy will not dispense overfill medications; 2) A 2 ml normal saline flush will be given after the medication is infused if a drug is delivered via syringe pump, and a 20 ml of normal saline flush if the medication is administered via regular infusion pump; 3) The use of injection ports proximally located next to intravenous (IV) insertion site is ideal; 4) The nursing staff will continue to use mechanical infusion devices to deliver IV medications and continue use of microbore IV tubing with small intraluminal diameter. EVALUATION: A special policy and procedure on intravenous drug delivery in PICU will be presented for approval to the Nursing Policy and Procedure Committee. Compliance with the procedure will be evaluated six months after implementation using a standardized tool. Pharmacokinetics study will be conducted to evaluate accuracy in drug delivery. This guideline will reduce variability in practice, simplify the delivery of parenteral medications, and prevent medication errors. The clinical nurses in our PICU were gratified with the empowerment provided to them with this practice change.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:26:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:26:17Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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