2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157121
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Herding CATs: A Nurse Managers Dream to Increase Quality of Care
Author(s):
Jacobs, Louise; Madrid, Pamela
Author Details:
Louise Jacobs, Mercy Hospital, Coon Rapids, Minnesota, USA, email: louise.jacobs@allina.com; Pamela Madrid
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Managing an adult medical surgical ICU can be a nightmare when it comes to ensuring positive patient outcomes in various populations of patients. Quality improvements include monitoring use and education of evidence based practice for all staff. The Manager is one individual and assistance was needed to move forward in improving quality of care within the unit. Nursing leadership and staff nurse collaboration was needed in order to educate staff and improve patient outcomes. Description: The Manager, Educator and Critical Care Clinical Nurse Specialist formulated and implemented a team of staff nurses to form a Clinical Action Team also known as a CAT. The respiratory population was the first CAT to be developed because of the need to reduce the Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP) that was occurring within the ICU population. The team included staff nurses, physicians, Critical Care Clinical Nurse Specialist, respiratory therapist and Infection Control nurse. The Nurse Manager and Educator were ad hoc members of the team. The CAT met monthly for four hours. The CAT coordinated VAP prevention strategies, monitored compliance with the ventilator bundle and educated the nursing staff. Monthly progress reports were given to the Nurse Manager and presented before the Critical Care Quality Improvement Committee. The development and implementation of the Respiratory CAT has been extremely successful with reducing VAP in the ICU. The team is still meeting monthly and continues to implement strategies to improve patient outcomes within the respiratory population. EVALUATION: With the success of the first CAT, three other ICU CATs have been developed: Infection Prevention, Neuro Trauma and Critical Care. The success of the ICU CATs has also been seen by other units within the hospital and they have implemented their own CATs depending on patient population of that unit. Staff nurses are engaged in the work of their CAT, they are proud of their accomplishments. Quality initiatives are implemented and monitored through the CATs. There has been a reduction in nosocomial infections and patient outcomes have improved within the ICU.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHerding CATs: A Nurse Managers Dream to Increase Quality of Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJacobs, Louiseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMadrid, Pamelaen_GB
dc.author.detailsLouise Jacobs, Mercy Hospital, Coon Rapids, Minnesota, USA, email: louise.jacobs@allina.com; Pamela Madriden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157121-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Managing an adult medical surgical ICU can be a nightmare when it comes to ensuring positive patient outcomes in various populations of patients. Quality improvements include monitoring use and education of evidence based practice for all staff. The Manager is one individual and assistance was needed to move forward in improving quality of care within the unit. Nursing leadership and staff nurse collaboration was needed in order to educate staff and improve patient outcomes. Description: The Manager, Educator and Critical Care Clinical Nurse Specialist formulated and implemented a team of staff nurses to form a Clinical Action Team also known as a CAT. The respiratory population was the first CAT to be developed because of the need to reduce the Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP) that was occurring within the ICU population. The team included staff nurses, physicians, Critical Care Clinical Nurse Specialist, respiratory therapist and Infection Control nurse. The Nurse Manager and Educator were ad hoc members of the team. The CAT met monthly for four hours. The CAT coordinated VAP prevention strategies, monitored compliance with the ventilator bundle and educated the nursing staff. Monthly progress reports were given to the Nurse Manager and presented before the Critical Care Quality Improvement Committee. The development and implementation of the Respiratory CAT has been extremely successful with reducing VAP in the ICU. The team is still meeting monthly and continues to implement strategies to improve patient outcomes within the respiratory population. EVALUATION: With the success of the first CAT, three other ICU CATs have been developed: Infection Prevention, Neuro Trauma and Critical Care. The success of the ICU CATs has also been seen by other units within the hospital and they have implemented their own CATs depending on patient population of that unit. Staff nurses are engaged in the work of their CAT, they are proud of their accomplishments. Quality initiatives are implemented and monitored through the CATs. There has been a reduction in nosocomial infections and patient outcomes have improved within the ICU.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:26:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:26:24Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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