2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157124
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Characteristics of Patient Readmitted to the Coronary ICU (CICU)
Author(s):
Klein, Deborah
Author Details:
Deborah Klein, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: kleind@ccf.org
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe the population of patients readmitted to a 16 bed CICU in a large Midwestern medical center over a one year period. By determining reasons for readmission and characteristics of the readmitted patient to the CICU, strategies can be developed and implemented that may decrease readmissions. BACKGROUND: Research indicates that patients readmitted to an ICU have mortality rates up to 6 times higher than those not readmitted and are 11 times more likely to die in the hospital. Readmission rates vary considerably from 0.89% to 19% with an average of 7.78%. Numerous studies have retrospectively examined readmissions, however, there is no clear indication of why ICU readmissions occur or what are their common characteristics. METHODS: The Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNSs) from the CICU and Progressive Care Units at a large teaching hospital tracked readmissions to the CICU from the Progressive Care Units for 1 year. Data collected from retrospective chart reviews included sex, age, length of stay in the CICU prior to transfer, reason(s) for readmission, and medical diagnoses. Patient assessments, intervention(s) and response(s) to intervention(s) leading up to the readmission were also reviewed. RESULTS: Over a one year period there were 31 patients with 33 readmission episodes to the CICU. There were 18 males and 13 females with an average age of 69 years. The readmission rate was 3%. The average length of stay in the CICU prior to transfer was 6.6 days. 97% had multiple comorbid conditions including diabetes, hypertension, heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery disease, renal failure, aortic stenosis, mitral valve regurgitation, aortic aneurysm, peripheral vascular disease, endocarditis, history of a stroke and/or arrhythmias. The most common reason for readmission was respiratory distress followed by arrhythmias and chest pain. CONCLUSIONS: The population readmitted to the CICU was older, sicker, and at risk for respiratory distress. The readmission rate of 3% was below the published average of 7.78%. Although it is unrealistic to expect no readmissions, strategies have been implemented that may reduce readmissions. Some of these include CNS to CNS consultation on complex patients prior to transfer, expanded RN to RN hand-off communication, and closer monitoring of patient respiratory status on the Progressive Care Units.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharacteristics of Patient Readmitted to the Coronary ICU (CICU)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorKlein, Deborahen_GB
dc.author.detailsDeborah Klein, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: kleind@ccf.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157124-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe the population of patients readmitted to a 16 bed CICU in a large Midwestern medical center over a one year period. By determining reasons for readmission and characteristics of the readmitted patient to the CICU, strategies can be developed and implemented that may decrease readmissions. BACKGROUND: Research indicates that patients readmitted to an ICU have mortality rates up to 6 times higher than those not readmitted and are 11 times more likely to die in the hospital. Readmission rates vary considerably from 0.89% to 19% with an average of 7.78%. Numerous studies have retrospectively examined readmissions, however, there is no clear indication of why ICU readmissions occur or what are their common characteristics. METHODS: The Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNSs) from the CICU and Progressive Care Units at a large teaching hospital tracked readmissions to the CICU from the Progressive Care Units for 1 year. Data collected from retrospective chart reviews included sex, age, length of stay in the CICU prior to transfer, reason(s) for readmission, and medical diagnoses. Patient assessments, intervention(s) and response(s) to intervention(s) leading up to the readmission were also reviewed. RESULTS: Over a one year period there were 31 patients with 33 readmission episodes to the CICU. There were 18 males and 13 females with an average age of 69 years. The readmission rate was 3%. The average length of stay in the CICU prior to transfer was 6.6 days. 97% had multiple comorbid conditions including diabetes, hypertension, heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery disease, renal failure, aortic stenosis, mitral valve regurgitation, aortic aneurysm, peripheral vascular disease, endocarditis, history of a stroke and/or arrhythmias. The most common reason for readmission was respiratory distress followed by arrhythmias and chest pain. CONCLUSIONS: The population readmitted to the CICU was older, sicker, and at risk for respiratory distress. The readmission rate of 3% was below the published average of 7.78%. Although it is unrealistic to expect no readmissions, strategies have been implemented that may reduce readmissions. Some of these include CNS to CNS consultation on complex patients prior to transfer, expanded RN to RN hand-off communication, and closer monitoring of patient respiratory status on the Progressive Care Units.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:26:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:26:33Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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