2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157126
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Are you Smarter than 5 CCRNs? Journey to Certification
Author(s):
Kubo, Akiko
Author Details:
Akiko Kubo, The University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, Kansas, USA, email: akubo@kumc.edu
Abstract:
PURPOSE: To increase the number of CCRN certified Registered Nurses in the Medical and Transplant ICUs as a marker of clinical excellence. Due to our fun and creative strategies, we received commitments from 27 nurses and increased the number of certifications 280% in 4 months! Description: Nurses and employers benefit from certification as it exhibits a commitment to professionalism, formally validates competency, and has been associated with a higher perception of empowerment and nurse retention. In the past, only 1-2 nurses pursued CCRN certification annually. We took advantage of AACN's group discount. Because the discount required commitments from at least 10 nurses, we opened up the pool to include both the Medical and Transplant ICUs, and we received 27 commitments! For the more experienced nurses who had 'put off' certification for years, the motivating factor was learning that a group of less experienced nurses had signed up. Thus, we started the "Are You Smarter Than 5 CCRNs?" campaign based on the popular game show! Weekly questions were posted on the unit and participants 'competed' against the current CCRNs to see if they were 'smarter than 5 CCRNs'. This encouraged mild, friendly competition and created a buzz on the unit! We assigned CCRN mentors to each and provided packets of study material, including practice questions and summary sheets, as well as a 16-week study plan to keep everyone on course. Several review sessions and the local AACN chapter's CCRN Review Course were well attended. EVALUATION: To aide us in further development of this program, we evaluated the participants' perceived barriers, benefits, and value of certification through the Perceived Value of Certification Tool (PVCT) - a tool with established reliability and validity. Barriers reported were the cost of the exam and lack of study time. Increased personal knowledge/growth and reimbursement of exam fees were reported incentives. The #1 perceived value of certification was personal accomplishment. Our # of CCRN certified nurses increased by 280%, from 10 to a total of 28! A new group is being encouraged to continue the momentum. We expect at least 18 more commitments over the next few weeks.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAre you Smarter than 5 CCRNs? Journey to Certificationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKubo, Akikoen_GB
dc.author.detailsAkiko Kubo, The University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, Kansas, USA, email: akubo@kumc.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157126-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To increase the number of CCRN certified Registered Nurses in the Medical and Transplant ICUs as a marker of clinical excellence. Due to our fun and creative strategies, we received commitments from 27 nurses and increased the number of certifications 280% in 4 months! Description: Nurses and employers benefit from certification as it exhibits a commitment to professionalism, formally validates competency, and has been associated with a higher perception of empowerment and nurse retention. In the past, only 1-2 nurses pursued CCRN certification annually. We took advantage of AACN's group discount. Because the discount required commitments from at least 10 nurses, we opened up the pool to include both the Medical and Transplant ICUs, and we received 27 commitments! For the more experienced nurses who had 'put off' certification for years, the motivating factor was learning that a group of less experienced nurses had signed up. Thus, we started the "Are You Smarter Than 5 CCRNs?" campaign based on the popular game show! Weekly questions were posted on the unit and participants 'competed' against the current CCRNs to see if they were 'smarter than 5 CCRNs'. This encouraged mild, friendly competition and created a buzz on the unit! We assigned CCRN mentors to each and provided packets of study material, including practice questions and summary sheets, as well as a 16-week study plan to keep everyone on course. Several review sessions and the local AACN chapter's CCRN Review Course were well attended. EVALUATION: To aide us in further development of this program, we evaluated the participants' perceived barriers, benefits, and value of certification through the Perceived Value of Certification Tool (PVCT) - a tool with established reliability and validity. Barriers reported were the cost of the exam and lack of study time. Increased personal knowledge/growth and reimbursement of exam fees were reported incentives. The #1 perceived value of certification was personal accomplishment. Our # of CCRN certified nurses increased by 280%, from 10 to a total of 28! A new group is being encouraged to continue the momentum. We expect at least 18 more commitments over the next few weeks.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:26:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:26:40Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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