2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157131
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Change Calendar: Enhancing Patient Safety Amidst an Avalanche of Change
Author(s):
LaVelle, Beth; Lavelle, Meghan; Valusek, Skip
Author Details:
Beth LaVelle, St. Joseph's Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA, email: Skypony2@baldwin-telecom.net; Skip Valusek; Meghan Lavelle
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Faced with too many competing demands for implementing change - some that we initiated and even more that were initiated for us - our staff, educators, and managers were wearing out. Without situational awareness, "planners" underestimated the energy it took to implement and sustain each change and the potential negative impact of "just one more thing" on patient safety and staff retention. In Fall 2007, we decided to create a "healthier work environment" by controlling the avalanche of change. Description: Change Calendars are tools used to reduce change fatigue and improve patient safety by providing a structure to a) forecast and proactively schedule changes that affect caregivers, b) accurately assess degree of impact of each change, c) purposefully plan how to meet educational needs, and d) justify requests to increase preceptor/educator staffing or even delay implementation. Individual changes are listed along the vertical axis of the grid; dates are rolled out along the horizontal axis; and within the body of the table are the departments affected and stages of actual and potential changes (plan, implement, evaluate, sustain). Overlays include the breadth of each change (system, site, department), key stakeholders, level of education needed (low, moderate, high), critical mass vs. mandatory, predicted ease of transition for staff, and concurrent demands for educational and unit resources. In fall 2007, nurses and other staff were surveyed of the changes in their departments, their perceptions of changes, and how changes affected patient safety. Then, a hospital-wide Change Calendar was created. The Calendar is continually updated with pilots, initiative, and changes submitted by our staff, educators, and directors. EVALUATION: Over 250 staff shared their perceptions of changes at work and the effect on patient safety. Administrators quickly came on board as the Change Calendar helped them grasp the volume and potential impact of changes on nursing staff and our patients. We have more balance in our initiatives. Reviews of changes that have gone badly usually indicate that closer consideration of the Calendar would have greatly facilitated the process and reduced staff angst. Some support departments have been slower to participant or recognize the consequences of their changes, but increasingly nurses push back, asking "Have you looked at the Change Calendar?" A formal reassessment of change is planned for 2009.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Change Calendar: Enhancing Patient Safety Amidst an Avalanche of Changeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLaVelle, Bethen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLavelle, Meghanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorValusek, Skipen_GB
dc.author.detailsBeth LaVelle, St. Joseph's Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA, email: Skypony2@baldwin-telecom.net; Skip Valusek; Meghan Lavelleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157131-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Faced with too many competing demands for implementing change - some that we initiated and even more that were initiated for us - our staff, educators, and managers were wearing out. Without situational awareness, "planners" underestimated the energy it took to implement and sustain each change and the potential negative impact of "just one more thing" on patient safety and staff retention. In Fall 2007, we decided to create a "healthier work environment" by controlling the avalanche of change. Description: Change Calendars are tools used to reduce change fatigue and improve patient safety by providing a structure to a) forecast and proactively schedule changes that affect caregivers, b) accurately assess degree of impact of each change, c) purposefully plan how to meet educational needs, and d) justify requests to increase preceptor/educator staffing or even delay implementation. Individual changes are listed along the vertical axis of the grid; dates are rolled out along the horizontal axis; and within the body of the table are the departments affected and stages of actual and potential changes (plan, implement, evaluate, sustain). Overlays include the breadth of each change (system, site, department), key stakeholders, level of education needed (low, moderate, high), critical mass vs. mandatory, predicted ease of transition for staff, and concurrent demands for educational and unit resources. In fall 2007, nurses and other staff were surveyed of the changes in their departments, their perceptions of changes, and how changes affected patient safety. Then, a hospital-wide Change Calendar was created. The Calendar is continually updated with pilots, initiative, and changes submitted by our staff, educators, and directors. EVALUATION: Over 250 staff shared their perceptions of changes at work and the effect on patient safety. Administrators quickly came on board as the Change Calendar helped them grasp the volume and potential impact of changes on nursing staff and our patients. We have more balance in our initiatives. Reviews of changes that have gone badly usually indicate that closer consideration of the Calendar would have greatly facilitated the process and reduced staff angst. Some support departments have been slower to participant or recognize the consequences of their changes, but increasingly nurses push back, asking "Have you looked at the Change Calendar?" A formal reassessment of change is planned for 2009.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:26:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:26:57Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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