Temporal artery scanning falls short as a secondary, noninvasive thermometry method for trauma patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157133
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Temporal artery scanning falls short as a secondary, noninvasive thermometry method for trauma patients
Author(s):
Marable, Kathleen
Author Details:
Kathleen Marable, Grant Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA, email: kmarable@sbcglobal.net
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Oral and mandibular trauma pose barriers to oral thermometry. We sought to determine whether temporal artery (TA) scanning thermometry could be an accurate, noninvasive back up method of thermometry in patients with these types of traumatic injury. BACKGROUND: Oral and mandibular trauma pose barriers to oral thermometry. METHODS: We compared three techniques of TA scanning, axillary thermometry, and oral thermometry in critical care patients. This study was a prospective, non-randomized study in which eligible participants served as their own controls. We obtained and recorded the body temperature of each patient one time using each of five different METHODS: a) sublingual oral temperature using a correctly calibrated oral thermometer probe; b) axillary temperature; c) temporal scanning by drawing the probe across the forehead and ending behind the ear; d) temporal scanning, by forehead scanning alone; e) temporal scanning, using the behind the ear position alone. RESULTS: The maximum acceptable average difference between any two methods was selected at 0.5 degrees F (2.5 degrees C). Under the assumption that the standard deviation (SD) between any two devices would be 1.1 degrees F (0.625 degrees C) and with selected type I error of 5% and type II error of 10%, the minimum required sample size was 68 patients 16. For each comparison, Bland-Altman analysis was performed. Bland-Altman analysis corrects for situations in which there is a high correlation but poor agreements, as well as provides an estimate of the variability in the differences between two methods 20. Linear regression examined whether the differences between any two methods varied systematically according to the patients underlying oral temperature. For each comparison of alternative method to oral thermometry, the proportion of patients with a difference of =0.5 degrees F was tabulated. The paired t-test compared the average absolute difference in temperature between oral and axillary thermometry to the average absolute difference between each TA scanning method and oral thermometry. Finally, McNemars test was performed to assess whether one method was more likely to classify a patient as having a fever than another method. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that TA scanning methods were, at best, comparable to axillary measurements. In addition, the performance of the TA scanners varied with body mass index (BMI), while axillary readings did not.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTemporal artery scanning falls short as a secondary, noninvasive thermometry method for trauma patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMarable, Kathleenen_GB
dc.author.detailsKathleen Marable, Grant Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA, email: kmarable@sbcglobal.neten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157133-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Oral and mandibular trauma pose barriers to oral thermometry. We sought to determine whether temporal artery (TA) scanning thermometry could be an accurate, noninvasive back up method of thermometry in patients with these types of traumatic injury. BACKGROUND: Oral and mandibular trauma pose barriers to oral thermometry. METHODS: We compared three techniques of TA scanning, axillary thermometry, and oral thermometry in critical care patients. This study was a prospective, non-randomized study in which eligible participants served as their own controls. We obtained and recorded the body temperature of each patient one time using each of five different METHODS: a) sublingual oral temperature using a correctly calibrated oral thermometer probe; b) axillary temperature; c) temporal scanning by drawing the probe across the forehead and ending behind the ear; d) temporal scanning, by forehead scanning alone; e) temporal scanning, using the behind the ear position alone. RESULTS: The maximum acceptable average difference between any two methods was selected at 0.5 degrees F (2.5 degrees C). Under the assumption that the standard deviation (SD) between any two devices would be 1.1 degrees F (0.625 degrees C) and with selected type I error of 5% and type II error of 10%, the minimum required sample size was 68 patients 16. For each comparison, Bland-Altman analysis was performed. Bland-Altman analysis corrects for situations in which there is a high correlation but poor agreements, as well as provides an estimate of the variability in the differences between two methods 20. Linear regression examined whether the differences between any two methods varied systematically according to the patients underlying oral temperature. For each comparison of alternative method to oral thermometry, the proportion of patients with a difference of =0.5 degrees F was tabulated. The paired t-test compared the average absolute difference in temperature between oral and axillary thermometry to the average absolute difference between each TA scanning method and oral thermometry. Finally, McNemars test was performed to assess whether one method was more likely to classify a patient as having a fever than another method. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that TA scanning methods were, at best, comparable to axillary measurements. In addition, the performance of the TA scanners varied with body mass index (BMI), while axillary readings did not.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:27:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:27:04Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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