2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157134
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pain Assessment Tool in the Non-Verbal Critically Ill CPACU Patient
Author(s):
Marmo, Liza
Author Details:
Liza Marmo, Morristown Memorial Hopital, Morristown, New Jersey, USA, email: liza.marmo@atlantichealth.org
Abstract:
PURPOSE: This was a replication study to compare three pain assessment tools in non-verbal critically ill patients for reliability. BACKGROUND: The critically ill non-verbal patient often is subjected to endure unnecessary painful treatments and nursing procedures because healthcare providers are unaware of the patient's pain. Critical care patients are at higher risk for untreated pain if they are unable to communicate. Pain that is persistent and untreated impacts the body systemically. This can result in developing post-operative complications, increase length of stay, morbidity and developing chronic pain syndromes. METHODS: A repeated measure design was used with a convenience sample of 24 nonverbal critically ill cardiac surgery patients in the recovery room. Two testing periods were conducted, included 3 assessments with the Critical Care Pain Observation Tool, Adult Non-verbal pain scale, and the Faces, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability, totaling 6 pain assessments post-operatively. Two events were studied suctioning and repositioning. Data was collected immediately prior to the event, one minute afterward, and 20 minutes following the event. Reliability was determined using the Cronbach alpha statistic, correlation between raters (Pearson r) and percent of agreement/disagreement between raters. RESULTS: Both the CPOT and NVPS were very reliable with Cronbach alpha coefficients of 0.89. Overall, the NVPS and CPOT were highly correlated for both raters (r>0.80, p=0.00) (11/12 times). Correlations between the 2 raters were generally moderate to high. Higher correlations were noted between raters with the CPOT. There was more disagreement between raters in overall pain scores for the NVPS. When raters disagreed it was most often in rating of the face on both scales. CONCLUSIONS: Both the NVPS and CPOT adequately captured pain in the nonverbal critically ill patient. Nurses disagreed most often on the face component of both scales followed by muscle tension. Disagreement was highest during the event, suctioning/turning. Pictures depicting facial expressions for scoring purposes are warranted. Adequate education and understanding of the use of these scales is critical for accurate assessment and subsequent interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePain Assessment Tool in the Non-Verbal Critically Ill CPACU Patienten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMarmo, Lizaen_GB
dc.author.detailsLiza Marmo, Morristown Memorial Hopital, Morristown, New Jersey, USA, email: liza.marmo@atlantichealth.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157134-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: This was a replication study to compare three pain assessment tools in non-verbal critically ill patients for reliability. BACKGROUND: The critically ill non-verbal patient often is subjected to endure unnecessary painful treatments and nursing procedures because healthcare providers are unaware of the patient's pain. Critical care patients are at higher risk for untreated pain if they are unable to communicate. Pain that is persistent and untreated impacts the body systemically. This can result in developing post-operative complications, increase length of stay, morbidity and developing chronic pain syndromes. METHODS: A repeated measure design was used with a convenience sample of 24 nonverbal critically ill cardiac surgery patients in the recovery room. Two testing periods were conducted, included 3 assessments with the Critical Care Pain Observation Tool, Adult Non-verbal pain scale, and the Faces, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability, totaling 6 pain assessments post-operatively. Two events were studied suctioning and repositioning. Data was collected immediately prior to the event, one minute afterward, and 20 minutes following the event. Reliability was determined using the Cronbach alpha statistic, correlation between raters (Pearson r) and percent of agreement/disagreement between raters. RESULTS: Both the CPOT and NVPS were very reliable with Cronbach alpha coefficients of 0.89. Overall, the NVPS and CPOT were highly correlated for both raters (r>0.80, p=0.00) (11/12 times). Correlations between the 2 raters were generally moderate to high. Higher correlations were noted between raters with the CPOT. There was more disagreement between raters in overall pain scores for the NVPS. When raters disagreed it was most often in rating of the face on both scales. CONCLUSIONS: Both the NVPS and CPOT adequately captured pain in the nonverbal critically ill patient. Nurses disagreed most often on the face component of both scales followed by muscle tension. Disagreement was highest during the event, suctioning/turning. Pictures depicting facial expressions for scoring purposes are warranted. Adequate education and understanding of the use of these scales is critical for accurate assessment and subsequent interventions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:27:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:27:07Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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