Hospital Nursing Staff Acting as Adjunct Clinical Instructors and the Impact on Nurse Vacancy Rates

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157140
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hospital Nursing Staff Acting as Adjunct Clinical Instructors and the Impact on Nurse Vacancy Rates
Author(s):
Miller, Katherine; Baker, Stephanie
Author Details:
Katherine Miller, Sisters of Charity Providence Hospitals, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: kamilrn@sc.rr.com; Stephanie Baker
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Nurse Recruitment/retention is a national problem. Hospitals with high turnover rates, defined as 22-43% turnover annually, have 36% higher costs per discharge, experience a lower return on assets, have increased length of stay, and higher risk adjusted mortality than hospitals with turnover rates less than 12% annually (Curtin, 2003). A nonprofit hospital with vacancy rates as high as 40% had two nurses teach one clinical group of students from a local program each semester. Description: This hospital, in an attempt to increase nursing student clinical rotations in the hospital collaborated with a local college of nursing program to have hospital nurses become clinical adjunct instructors. Organizational Development sought out Clinical Nurse Managers with the appropriate credentials who would have an interest in teaching one clinical student group per semester, two semesters annually. The Chief Nursing Officer was instrumental in assisting with the selection of Clinical Managers that would be able to teach nursing students. Each Clinical Nurse Manager was allowed to adjust to a compressed work week of four ten hour days to accommodate the clinical instruction of nursing students. The managers are able to stay on their own units with the students. Each manager has attended orientation as a clinical adjunct at the college of nursing and follows all faculty guidelines in the instruction of the students. Evaluations/Outcomes: With the addition of two Clinical Nurse Managers as adjunct clinical instructors nursing student clinical rotations have increased at this hospital. The vacancy rates on these manager's units are now 0 to 7%. Other units in the hospital run as high as 40%. Nursing recruitment hospital wide has improved with the increased exposure through the nursing clinical rotations available at this hospital. Nursing student satisfaction with the two managers/adjunct clinical instructors is high and other qualified nurses are now working as adjunct clinical instructors on nursing units with higher vacancy rates.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHospital Nursing Staff Acting as Adjunct Clinical Instructors and the Impact on Nurse Vacancy Ratesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Katherineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Stephanieen_GB
dc.author.detailsKatherine Miller, Sisters of Charity Providence Hospitals, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: kamilrn@sc.rr.com; Stephanie Bakeren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157140-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Nurse Recruitment/retention is a national problem. Hospitals with high turnover rates, defined as 22-43% turnover annually, have 36% higher costs per discharge, experience a lower return on assets, have increased length of stay, and higher risk adjusted mortality than hospitals with turnover rates less than 12% annually (Curtin, 2003). A nonprofit hospital with vacancy rates as high as 40% had two nurses teach one clinical group of students from a local program each semester. Description: This hospital, in an attempt to increase nursing student clinical rotations in the hospital collaborated with a local college of nursing program to have hospital nurses become clinical adjunct instructors. Organizational Development sought out Clinical Nurse Managers with the appropriate credentials who would have an interest in teaching one clinical student group per semester, two semesters annually. The Chief Nursing Officer was instrumental in assisting with the selection of Clinical Managers that would be able to teach nursing students. Each Clinical Nurse Manager was allowed to adjust to a compressed work week of four ten hour days to accommodate the clinical instruction of nursing students. The managers are able to stay on their own units with the students. Each manager has attended orientation as a clinical adjunct at the college of nursing and follows all faculty guidelines in the instruction of the students. Evaluations/Outcomes: With the addition of two Clinical Nurse Managers as adjunct clinical instructors nursing student clinical rotations have increased at this hospital. The vacancy rates on these manager's units are now 0 to 7%. Other units in the hospital run as high as 40%. Nursing recruitment hospital wide has improved with the increased exposure through the nursing clinical rotations available at this hospital. Nursing student satisfaction with the two managers/adjunct clinical instructors is high and other qualified nurses are now working as adjunct clinical instructors on nursing units with higher vacancy rates.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:27:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:27:27Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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