Secondary Traumatic Stress, Burnout, Compassion Fatigue and Compassion Satisfaction in Trauma Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157144
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Secondary Traumatic Stress, Burnout, Compassion Fatigue and Compassion Satisfaction in Trauma Nurses
Author(s):
Murray, Mary; Logan, Theresa; Simmons, Katie; Kramer, Mary Betsy; Brown, Erica; Hake, Sara; Gilmore, Rebecca; McQuillan, Karen; Madsen, Melissa
Author Details:
Mary Murray, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: mmurray@umm.edu; Theresa Logan; Katie Simmons; Mary Betsy Kramer; Erica Brown; Sara Hake; Rebecca Gilmore; Karen McQuillan; Melissa Madsen
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The primary aim of this study was to determine the incidence of secondary traumatic stress (STS) and its relationship to burnout (BO), compassion fatigue (CF), and compassion satisfaction (CS) in nurses who primarily care for trauma patients. Secondary aims included describing their associations with personal characteristics, exposure to trauma variables, and coping strategies. BACKGROUND: BO and CF may be associated with work-related exposure to extremely stressful events, such as those experienced by nurses who work in trauma centers or emergency departments. Frequent exposure to seriously injured patients or death and associated STS has been studied in the military population, but little evidence exists related to the cumulative effect of such stressors in civilian nurses who care for trauma patients on a daily or near daily basis. METHODS: The Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL), Penn Inventory (PI) and demographic/behavioral survey were distributed to 262 nurses from all units in an urban all trauma hospital. ProQOL, a 30 item self-administered tool, assesses BO, CF and CS. PI, a 26 item self-administered tool, measures the presence of STS. The demographic/behavioral survey included questions about work experience, support systems and coping strategies. Completed surveys were returned anonymously via drop boxes. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the frequency of STS, BO, CF and CS. Pearson correlations were used to analyze relationships between these scores and nurse demographic and behavioral characteristics. RESULTS: Surveys were returned by 128 (49%) nurses; of those, 9 (7%) had PI scores indicative of STS. Those with STS reported BO (r=.551, p=.000) and CF (r=.421, p=.000). BO and CF scores were correlated (r=.596, p=.000). Three variables correlated with BO and CF: increased hours/shift (BO r=.254, p=.005; CF r=.255, p=.006); use of medicinals (BO r=.309, p=.001; CF r=.250, p=.006); and weaker coworker relationships (BO r=.396, p=.000; CF r=.309, p=.001). Years in trauma nursing, education and age were not related to BO or CF. Those with CS did not report STS, BO or CF. CS correlated (p=.000) with lower education level, meditation use, greater strength of supports and strong coworker relationships. CONCLUSIONS: Although a majority of respondents did not report BO, CF or STS, the data shows that relationships exist between BO, CF, STS and hours working/shift, coping strategies and support systems. Social supports may be an important factor in managing stress and CS in nurses who primarily care for trauma patients. Further research is required to examine these relationships and explore the predictive value of behavioral/demographic variables on the development of BO, CF and STS.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSecondary Traumatic Stress, Burnout, Compassion Fatigue and Compassion Satisfaction in Trauma Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Theresaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSimmons, Katieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKramer, Mary Betsyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Ericaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHake, Saraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGilmore, Rebeccaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcQuillan, Karenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMadsen, Melissaen_GB
dc.author.detailsMary Murray, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: mmurray@umm.edu; Theresa Logan; Katie Simmons; Mary Betsy Kramer; Erica Brown; Sara Hake; Rebecca Gilmore; Karen McQuillan; Melissa Madsenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157144-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The primary aim of this study was to determine the incidence of secondary traumatic stress (STS) and its relationship to burnout (BO), compassion fatigue (CF), and compassion satisfaction (CS) in nurses who primarily care for trauma patients. Secondary aims included describing their associations with personal characteristics, exposure to trauma variables, and coping strategies. BACKGROUND: BO and CF may be associated with work-related exposure to extremely stressful events, such as those experienced by nurses who work in trauma centers or emergency departments. Frequent exposure to seriously injured patients or death and associated STS has been studied in the military population, but little evidence exists related to the cumulative effect of such stressors in civilian nurses who care for trauma patients on a daily or near daily basis. METHODS: The Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL), Penn Inventory (PI) and demographic/behavioral survey were distributed to 262 nurses from all units in an urban all trauma hospital. ProQOL, a 30 item self-administered tool, assesses BO, CF and CS. PI, a 26 item self-administered tool, measures the presence of STS. The demographic/behavioral survey included questions about work experience, support systems and coping strategies. Completed surveys were returned anonymously via drop boxes. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the frequency of STS, BO, CF and CS. Pearson correlations were used to analyze relationships between these scores and nurse demographic and behavioral characteristics. RESULTS: Surveys were returned by 128 (49%) nurses; of those, 9 (7%) had PI scores indicative of STS. Those with STS reported BO (r=.551, p=.000) and CF (r=.421, p=.000). BO and CF scores were correlated (r=.596, p=.000). Three variables correlated with BO and CF: increased hours/shift (BO r=.254, p=.005; CF r=.255, p=.006); use of medicinals (BO r=.309, p=.001; CF r=.250, p=.006); and weaker coworker relationships (BO r=.396, p=.000; CF r=.309, p=.001). Years in trauma nursing, education and age were not related to BO or CF. Those with CS did not report STS, BO or CF. CS correlated (p=.000) with lower education level, meditation use, greater strength of supports and strong coworker relationships. CONCLUSIONS: Although a majority of respondents did not report BO, CF or STS, the data shows that relationships exist between BO, CF, STS and hours working/shift, coping strategies and support systems. Social supports may be an important factor in managing stress and CS in nurses who primarily care for trauma patients. Further research is required to examine these relationships and explore the predictive value of behavioral/demographic variables on the development of BO, CF and STS.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:27:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:27:37Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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