2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157147
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Sound of Music: Integrating Arts & Humanities in a Progressive Care Unit
Author(s):
Niemchak, Stephanie; Fuller, Delores
Author Details:
Stephanie Niemchak, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: niemc001@mc.duke.edu; Delores Fuller
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Patients in our 28 bed Progressive Care Unit have an average length of stay of 5 days, but many chronic patients stay for months. In an effort to improve patient satisfaction, and create a Healthy Work Environment, we went in search of alternative opportunities to enhance the unit environment for patients, families and staff alike. In looking within our own institution, we discovered a treasure that we felt was underutilized and underappreciated: Health Arts Network @ ----. (HAND). DESCRIPTION: Our Progressive Care Unit often has patients on chronic mechanical ventilation or other types of restrictive technology, that makes leaving their rooms or even the unit an impossibility. We partnered with HAND to increase their visibility on our unit and in individual patient rooms. We discussed ideal times of day, when patients were awake, and families likely to be present. In an effort to avoid disturbing our multidisciplinary, collaborative patient morning rounds, afternoons and evenings were determined to be the ideal times of day. Artists, singers, musicians, dancers and poets would come to our unit as soloists or in small group ensembles. They checked in with the Charge Nurse each visit, to inquire on patients or families who might benefit from their artistry, time and talent. When possible, they would go directly into patient rooms. When isolation prohibited this, they would stand outside the patient room and perform in the hallway, often taking requests. EVALUATION: HAND has visited our unit often, with performances every week or two. As a result of the positive feedback, the staff assembled a choral group to perform during the Christmas Holidays, visiting each patient room on Christmas Eve. End-of-Life Care sometimes includes staff singing to patients upon request. Individual nurses have also been asked to sing at patient funerals on more than one occasion, a direct result of this performing arts initiative. A final measure of success has been our patient satisfaction ratings not only improving from last year, but exceeding the goal on our balanced scorecard, indicative of an improved and Healthy Work Environment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Sound of Music: Integrating Arts & Humanities in a Progressive Care Uniten_GB
dc.contributor.authorNiemchak, Stephanieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFuller, Deloresen_GB
dc.author.detailsStephanie Niemchak, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: niemc001@mc.duke.edu; Delores Fulleren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157147-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Patients in our 28 bed Progressive Care Unit have an average length of stay of 5 days, but many chronic patients stay for months. In an effort to improve patient satisfaction, and create a Healthy Work Environment, we went in search of alternative opportunities to enhance the unit environment for patients, families and staff alike. In looking within our own institution, we discovered a treasure that we felt was underutilized and underappreciated: Health Arts Network @ ----. (HAND). DESCRIPTION: Our Progressive Care Unit often has patients on chronic mechanical ventilation or other types of restrictive technology, that makes leaving their rooms or even the unit an impossibility. We partnered with HAND to increase their visibility on our unit and in individual patient rooms. We discussed ideal times of day, when patients were awake, and families likely to be present. In an effort to avoid disturbing our multidisciplinary, collaborative patient morning rounds, afternoons and evenings were determined to be the ideal times of day. Artists, singers, musicians, dancers and poets would come to our unit as soloists or in small group ensembles. They checked in with the Charge Nurse each visit, to inquire on patients or families who might benefit from their artistry, time and talent. When possible, they would go directly into patient rooms. When isolation prohibited this, they would stand outside the patient room and perform in the hallway, often taking requests. EVALUATION: HAND has visited our unit often, with performances every week or two. As a result of the positive feedback, the staff assembled a choral group to perform during the Christmas Holidays, visiting each patient room on Christmas Eve. End-of-Life Care sometimes includes staff singing to patients upon request. Individual nurses have also been asked to sing at patient funerals on more than one occasion, a direct result of this performing arts initiative. A final measure of success has been our patient satisfaction ratings not only improving from last year, but exceeding the goal on our balanced scorecard, indicative of an improved and Healthy Work Environment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:27:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:27:47Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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