2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157149
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Three's Company in New Graduate Orientation
Author(s):
O'Connor, Megan; Adams, Rebecca
Author Details:
Megan O'Connor, UNC Health Care Chapel, Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: moconnor@unch.unc.edu; Rebecca Adams
Abstract:
PURPOSE: As nursing changes, it is challenging to provide an efficient and comprehensive orientation program for new nurses. Challenges include the lack of experienced and skilled preceptors, increased patient acuity, staffing shortages, and generational differences. A 12 bed PCU trialed a team mentoring orientation program with a group of six new nurses. The program was designed to meet the needs of new nurses, including emotional and professional support, while utilizing a small group of mentors. Description: New graduate nurses were divided into two teams of three nurses. Each team was paired with 1 preceptor. The first week of orientation on the unit, they attended 2 unit specific seminar days which included survival tips, orientation guidelines, nursing policies, and team building games. The new graduate nurses worked two 8 hour shifts and two 12 hour shifts the second week of orientation. The 8 hour shifts were provided by the hospital's nursing education department and included a review of critical care skills. The 12 hour shifts were worked on the unit in their teams. Each team was responsible for the care of 3 patients. Within the teams, each new graduate nurse was assigned to 1 patient and was primarily responsible for that patient's care with assistance from the preceptor. Weeks 3 through 7 both teams worked 12 hour shifts. The patient load went from 1 to 2 patients. Both preceptors managed a maximum of 4 patients and 2 new graduate nurses. The third nurse rotated through a series of shadow experiences and night shifts. At the beginning of week 8, a third orientation seminar day was completed. During weeks 8 through 10 they were paired with individual preceptors and patient load increased to three patients. EVALUATION: We retained all 6 new graduates at the one year mark. Two of the new graduates have informed us of their intention to leave due to preparation for CRNA school and moving back to a home state. There has been an increase in patient satisfaction scores from 86.8% to 88.2%. Our vacancy decreased to 9%. Several quality indicators improved including prn medication documentation from 86% to 0% noncompliance, nosocomial infections decreased from 6.9% to 0.8%, and patient/family education documentation from 100% to 0% noncompliance. The program
has radically improved participant confidence and expertise,
as well as unit morale and cohesion.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThree's Company in New Graduate Orientationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Meganen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Rebeccaen_GB
dc.author.detailsMegan O'Connor, UNC Health Care Chapel, Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: moconnor@unch.unc.edu; Rebecca Adamsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157149-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: As nursing changes, it is challenging to provide an efficient and comprehensive orientation program for new nurses. Challenges include the lack of experienced and skilled preceptors, increased patient acuity, staffing shortages, and generational differences. A 12 bed PCU trialed a team mentoring orientation program with a group of six new nurses. The program was designed to meet the needs of new nurses, including emotional and professional support, while utilizing a small group of mentors. Description: New graduate nurses were divided into two teams of three nurses. Each team was paired with 1 preceptor. The first week of orientation on the unit, they attended 2 unit specific seminar days which included survival tips, orientation guidelines, nursing policies, and team building games. The new graduate nurses worked two 8 hour shifts and two 12 hour shifts the second week of orientation. The 8 hour shifts were provided by the hospital's nursing education department and included a review of critical care skills. The 12 hour shifts were worked on the unit in their teams. Each team was responsible for the care of 3 patients. Within the teams, each new graduate nurse was assigned to 1 patient and was primarily responsible for that patient's care with assistance from the preceptor. Weeks 3 through 7 both teams worked 12 hour shifts. The patient load went from 1 to 2 patients. Both preceptors managed a maximum of 4 patients and 2 new graduate nurses. The third nurse rotated through a series of shadow experiences and night shifts. At the beginning of week 8, a third orientation seminar day was completed. During weeks 8 through 10 they were paired with individual preceptors and patient load increased to three patients. EVALUATION: We retained all 6 new graduates at the one year mark. Two of the new graduates have informed us of their intention to leave due to preparation for CRNA school and moving back to a home state. There has been an increase in patient satisfaction scores from 86.8% to 88.2%. Our vacancy decreased to 9%. Several quality indicators improved including prn medication documentation from 86% to 0% noncompliance, nosocomial infections decreased from 6.9% to 0.8%, and patient/family education documentation from 100% to 0% noncompliance. The program<br/>has radically improved participant confidence and expertise,<br/>as well as unit morale and cohesion.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:27:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:27:54Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.