The Impact of Evidenced-Based Practices in Reducing Catheter-Related Blood Stream Infections in a Pediatric CTICU

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157152
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Evidenced-Based Practices in Reducing Catheter-Related Blood Stream Infections in a Pediatric CTICU
Author(s):
Oriza, Nida; Kuyumjian, Grace; Imperial-Perez, Flerida; Rizzi-Wagner, Lisa
Author Details:
Nida Oriza, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA, email: nidaoriza@hotmail.com; Grace Kuyumjian; Flerida Imperial-Perez; Lisa Rizzi-Wagner
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Catheter-Related Blood Stream Infection (CRBSI) is the cause of 12%-25% of morbidity and mortality and has a marginal cost to the health-care system of $28,000 per infection. Among 54 pediatric intensive care units surveyed in the United States, there was a 6.6 CRBSI rate per 1,000 catheter days. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine the best evidence-based interventions that a Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit (CTICU) has implemented and its impact in the reduction of CRBSI. Description: During a 3-year study period, we tracked the incidence of CRBSI and utilized several interventions based on strong evidence from the CDC and Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee and AACN Practice Alert: Preventing Catheter Related Blood Stream Infection. The evidence-based interventions are strongly supported with scientific data, categorized as Level I-A. The performance indicators we used in reducing CA-BSI are 1) implementation of educational programs including didactic and interactive components for those who insert and maintain catheters 2) implementation of a catheter insertion bundle using maximal sterile barrier precautions during catheter placement and the maintenance bundle for dressing changes 3) use of chlorhexidine for skin anti-sepsis 4) daily needs assessment for central line added to CTICU Daily Goal Tracking for catheter discontinuation when it is no longer essential for medical management and 5) use of alcohol-based rub with hand hygiene practices. We performed compliance audits and reported data to the CTICU Performance Improvement Committee on a monthly basis. EVALUATION: Based on the audits performed, the compliance rates were as follows: 1) Hand Hygiene: 30% -80 %, 2) Insertion Bundle: 25%-100%, 3) Maintenance Bundle: 83%-100%, 4) Daily Goals tracking: 61%-100%. CRBSI occurrences decreased to 84% and BSI occurrences improved from 17 to 289 days. The combined utilization of evidenced-based practices made a significant impact in the reduction of CRBSI in the CTICU. To sustain practice compliance, continuing education to heighten awareness of BSIs and the use of evidence-based strategies for prevention will be included in staff meetings, e-mails, poster updates, and a CRBSI board.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Evidenced-Based Practices in Reducing Catheter-Related Blood Stream Infections in a Pediatric CTICUen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOriza, Nidaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKuyumjian, Graceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorImperial-Perez, Fleridaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRizzi-Wagner, Lisaen_GB
dc.author.detailsNida Oriza, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA, email: nidaoriza@hotmail.com; Grace Kuyumjian; Flerida Imperial-Perez; Lisa Rizzi-Wagneren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157152-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Catheter-Related Blood Stream Infection (CRBSI) is the cause of 12%-25% of morbidity and mortality and has a marginal cost to the health-care system of $28,000 per infection. Among 54 pediatric intensive care units surveyed in the United States, there was a 6.6 CRBSI rate per 1,000 catheter days. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine the best evidence-based interventions that a Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit (CTICU) has implemented and its impact in the reduction of CRBSI. Description: During a 3-year study period, we tracked the incidence of CRBSI and utilized several interventions based on strong evidence from the CDC and Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee and AACN Practice Alert: Preventing Catheter Related Blood Stream Infection. The evidence-based interventions are strongly supported with scientific data, categorized as Level I-A. The performance indicators we used in reducing CA-BSI are 1) implementation of educational programs including didactic and interactive components for those who insert and maintain catheters 2) implementation of a catheter insertion bundle using maximal sterile barrier precautions during catheter placement and the maintenance bundle for dressing changes 3) use of chlorhexidine for skin anti-sepsis 4) daily needs assessment for central line added to CTICU Daily Goal Tracking for catheter discontinuation when it is no longer essential for medical management and 5) use of alcohol-based rub with hand hygiene practices. We performed compliance audits and reported data to the CTICU Performance Improvement Committee on a monthly basis. EVALUATION: Based on the audits performed, the compliance rates were as follows: 1) Hand Hygiene: 30% -80 %, 2) Insertion Bundle: 25%-100%, 3) Maintenance Bundle: 83%-100%, 4) Daily Goals tracking: 61%-100%. CRBSI occurrences decreased to 84% and BSI occurrences improved from 17 to 289 days. The combined utilization of evidenced-based practices made a significant impact in the reduction of CRBSI in the CTICU. To sustain practice compliance, continuing education to heighten awareness of BSIs and the use of evidence-based strategies for prevention will be included in staff meetings, e-mails, poster updates, and a CRBSI board.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:28:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:28:04Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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