You are What you Eat from your Head To your Feet-Translating Nutritional Therapy Evidence Into Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157167
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
You are What you Eat from your Head To your Feet-Translating Nutritional Therapy Evidence Into Practice
Author(s):
Rickelmann, Constance; Wonnacott, Robert; Montanaro, Nicholas; Krzak, Anna; Wooley, Jennifer; Pleva, Melissa; Uptigrove, Trish; Dickinson, Sharon
Author Details:
Constance Rickelmann, University Of Michigan Hospital and Health Centers, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, email: crickelm@umich.edu; Robert Wonnacott; Nicholas Montanaro; Anna Krzak; Jennifer Wooley; Melissa Pleva; Trish Uptigrove; Sharon Dickinson
Abstract:
PURPOSE: There is strong evidence to suggest that nutrition therapy is an important component in the management of critically ill patients. Our Surgical ICU lacked a coordinated effort to consistently and effectively deliver this therapy. An interdisciplinary team consisting of ICU nurses, a dietitian, pharmacist and physician formed six sub-committees to evaluate evidence on nutrition-related care. Standards of care (SOC) were developed to provide safe nutrition therapy and improve clinical outcomes Description: In January of 2008 a Clinical Practice Committee in the Surgical ICU (SICU) was formed to address nutrition support therapy. After review of the current literature, American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition standards, American Association of Critical Care Nurses guidelines regarding enteral feeding, and Society of Critical Care Medicine 2005 guidelines regarding nutrition as a therapeutic agent to improve critical care outcomes, SOC were developed. The SOC detailed evidenced based guidelines related to nutrition therapy for the six sub-committees. The focus of the sub-committees included: glycemic control, parenteral nutrition, small bowel feeding tube placement, adequacy of nutrition, and mechanical considerations of feeding on the upper and lower GI tract. The addition of a dietitian to the SICU team enhanced the translation of evidence based guidelines to promote appropriate and efficient nutrition therapy. The work of the sub-committees was operationalized and implemented in the SICU. Data analyses of the SOC were disseminated to the unit leadership and staff to reinforce compliance and improve outcomes. EVALUATION: Our results provide multiple opportunities for implementation of quality improvement measures by the healthcare team to enhance nutrition care in the ICU. Implementation of nutrition SOC highlights the importance of a proactive approach to nutrition therapy. Execution of nutrition based protocols is done best with an interdisciplinary team as evidenced by the end products of each subgroup These include: compliance with moderate glucose control (110-150mg/dl), appropriate use of enteral vs. parenteral nutrition, standardized feeding tube placement, early initiation of enteral feeding, advancement to caloric goal, and a bowel protocol was developed to prevent constipation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleYou are What you Eat from your Head To your Feet-Translating Nutritional Therapy Evidence Into Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRickelmann, Constanceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWonnacott, Roberten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMontanaro, Nicholasen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKrzak, Annaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWooley, Jenniferen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPleva, Melissaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorUptigrove, Trishen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDickinson, Sharonen_GB
dc.author.detailsConstance Rickelmann, University Of Michigan Hospital and Health Centers, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, email: crickelm@umich.edu; Robert Wonnacott; Nicholas Montanaro; Anna Krzak; Jennifer Wooley; Melissa Pleva; Trish Uptigrove; Sharon Dickinsonen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157167-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: There is strong evidence to suggest that nutrition therapy is an important component in the management of critically ill patients. Our Surgical ICU lacked a coordinated effort to consistently and effectively deliver this therapy. An interdisciplinary team consisting of ICU nurses, a dietitian, pharmacist and physician formed six sub-committees to evaluate evidence on nutrition-related care. Standards of care (SOC) were developed to provide safe nutrition therapy and improve clinical outcomes Description: In January of 2008 a Clinical Practice Committee in the Surgical ICU (SICU) was formed to address nutrition support therapy. After review of the current literature, American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition standards, American Association of Critical Care Nurses guidelines regarding enteral feeding, and Society of Critical Care Medicine 2005 guidelines regarding nutrition as a therapeutic agent to improve critical care outcomes, SOC were developed. The SOC detailed evidenced based guidelines related to nutrition therapy for the six sub-committees. The focus of the sub-committees included: glycemic control, parenteral nutrition, small bowel feeding tube placement, adequacy of nutrition, and mechanical considerations of feeding on the upper and lower GI tract. The addition of a dietitian to the SICU team enhanced the translation of evidence based guidelines to promote appropriate and efficient nutrition therapy. The work of the sub-committees was operationalized and implemented in the SICU. Data analyses of the SOC were disseminated to the unit leadership and staff to reinforce compliance and improve outcomes. EVALUATION: Our results provide multiple opportunities for implementation of quality improvement measures by the healthcare team to enhance nutrition care in the ICU. Implementation of nutrition SOC highlights the importance of a proactive approach to nutrition therapy. Execution of nutrition based protocols is done best with an interdisciplinary team as evidenced by the end products of each subgroup These include: compliance with moderate glucose control (110-150mg/dl), appropriate use of enteral vs. parenteral nutrition, standardized feeding tube placement, early initiation of enteral feeding, advancement to caloric goal, and a bowel protocol was developed to prevent constipation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:28:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:28:54Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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