2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157168
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effective Pain Management Promotes Positive Patient Outcomes
Author(s):
Rivera, Rachael; Nolan, Andrea; Eccleston, Sarah
Author Details:
Rachael Rivera, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, USA, email: rchlmyrs@gmail.com; Andrea Nolan; Sarah Eccleston
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The purpose of this Process Improvement (PI) initiative is to evaluate post-intervention assessment of patient's pain. Ineffective pain management is a common cause for detrimental patient outcomes to include higher morbidity and mortality rates (Kersten, Page l, & Warltier, 2000). Poor pain assessments after a nursing intervention may be the primary reason for incomplete pain management and unsatisfactory outcomes (Management approaches, 2000). BACKGROUND: In January 2001 The Joint Commission (TJC) implemented a new Pain Standard; Pain is assessed in all patients (Pain, 2007). To ensure compliance, in 2002, Brooke Army Medical Center began a PI initiative to evaluate the current pain management practices throughout the hospital. After TJC survey in 2006, the PI committee discovered a need to improve the occurrence of pain reassessment 1 hour after medical intervention. In October of 2007, weekly chart audits began to evaluate nursing compliance. METHODS: The design is a retrospective chart review, comparing nursing pain reassessment 1 hour after intervention prior to education and after education. The setting was 10 inpatient nursing units in a 224-bed, Level 1 trauma center. The sample involved 2,858 inpatient charts. Weekly, all units randomly audited 10 nurses on pain reassessment after intervention, with an average of 85 different nurses per week. Data were collected over 42 weeks using a standardized reassessment audit tool. The first 2 weeks of data were considered pre-education; the remaining 40 weeks post education. The statistics were recorded and graphically trended to evaluate overall compliance with the benchmark of 90%. RESULTS: Overall, after 40 weeks of post education data collection, nursing compliance of post-intervention assessment improved 26%. In addition, this data revealed a new hospital average of 89.2%. This still falls short of Brooke Army Medical Center's 90% benchmark. However, it demonstrates an impressive hospital wide improvement. The first 2 weeks in 2007, prior to education, nursing compliance was at 56%. Unit level statistics were trended as well, with a maximum improvement of 55% and a minimum improvement of 8%. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that with weekly chart audits and nursing education, post-intervention pain assessment has remarkable improved. Weekly chart audits, PI committee data distribution, and continuous staff education contributed to improved compliance. All units improved their efficacy in patient pain evaluation by successfully reassessing pain one hour after intervention. Brooke Army Medical Center is committed to the assessment, prevention, and treatment of pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffective Pain Management Promotes Positive Patient Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRivera, Rachaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNolan, Andreaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEccleston, Sarahen_GB
dc.author.detailsRachael Rivera, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, USA, email: rchlmyrs@gmail.com; Andrea Nolan; Sarah Ecclestonen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157168-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The purpose of this Process Improvement (PI) initiative is to evaluate post-intervention assessment of patient's pain. Ineffective pain management is a common cause for detrimental patient outcomes to include higher morbidity and mortality rates (Kersten, Page l, & Warltier, 2000). Poor pain assessments after a nursing intervention may be the primary reason for incomplete pain management and unsatisfactory outcomes (Management approaches, 2000). BACKGROUND: In January 2001 The Joint Commission (TJC) implemented a new Pain Standard; Pain is assessed in all patients (Pain, 2007). To ensure compliance, in 2002, Brooke Army Medical Center began a PI initiative to evaluate the current pain management practices throughout the hospital. After TJC survey in 2006, the PI committee discovered a need to improve the occurrence of pain reassessment 1 hour after medical intervention. In October of 2007, weekly chart audits began to evaluate nursing compliance. METHODS: The design is a retrospective chart review, comparing nursing pain reassessment 1 hour after intervention prior to education and after education. The setting was 10 inpatient nursing units in a 224-bed, Level 1 trauma center. The sample involved 2,858 inpatient charts. Weekly, all units randomly audited 10 nurses on pain reassessment after intervention, with an average of 85 different nurses per week. Data were collected over 42 weeks using a standardized reassessment audit tool. The first 2 weeks of data were considered pre-education; the remaining 40 weeks post education. The statistics were recorded and graphically trended to evaluate overall compliance with the benchmark of 90%. RESULTS: Overall, after 40 weeks of post education data collection, nursing compliance of post-intervention assessment improved 26%. In addition, this data revealed a new hospital average of 89.2%. This still falls short of Brooke Army Medical Center's 90% benchmark. However, it demonstrates an impressive hospital wide improvement. The first 2 weeks in 2007, prior to education, nursing compliance was at 56%. Unit level statistics were trended as well, with a maximum improvement of 55% and a minimum improvement of 8%. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that with weekly chart audits and nursing education, post-intervention pain assessment has remarkable improved. Weekly chart audits, PI committee data distribution, and continuous staff education contributed to improved compliance. All units improved their efficacy in patient pain evaluation by successfully reassessing pain one hour after intervention. Brooke Army Medical Center is committed to the assessment, prevention, and treatment of pain.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:28:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:28:57Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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