An Exploratory, descriptive pilot study to examine the quality of hand-offs reports using the ISBAR technique.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157175
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Exploratory, descriptive pilot study to examine the quality of hand-offs reports using the ISBAR technique.
Author(s):
Zafian, Ruthann
Author Details:
Ruthann Zafian, email: rzafian@harthosp.org
Abstract:
PURPOSE/RESEARCH QUESTIONS: To determine if staff members who have been taught the ISBAR hand-off technique are using the technique for hand-off reports. To examine the effectiveness of hand-off reports when ISBAR is used and when it is not used. Purpose & Rationale: Communication of information that is timely, accurate, complete and directive between healthcare providers is essential to quality patient care. ISBAR is a type of hand-off report technique that healthcare providers can use to improve the quality of their hand-off reports. This institution implemented this hand-off technique in the Fall of 2006. One year later, the task-force who chose ISBAR needed to quantify and qualify the use of the ISBAR technique amongst its staff. BACKGROUND: Literature Review Synthesis: As identified by the Joint Commission in their publication: Patient Safety Solutions, Communication breakdowns were the leading cause of sentinel events in the United States between 1995 and 2006. Healthcare hand-off best practice techniques and processes have not yet been established, however lessons can be taken from other industries. The use of a common communication technique such as SBAR, used initially in the military and the aviation industries provides one such lesson. Though articles regarding the use SBAR are common in current healthcare literature, research studies regarding its use and effects are rare. METHODS / PROCEDURES: RN Clinical leaders from the department of Nursing and leaders from other departments who were previously trained in the ISBAR technique, were re-educated regarding use of the ISBAR technique, the data collection process for this study and the use of the evaluation tool. They were then asked to witness 5 hand-off reports over a two month period. Prior to witnessing the report, verbal consent of the 2 parties was obtained. When the hand-off report was complete, the interviewer interviewed the provider of the report and the recipient of the report. Completed data collection forms were returned to the principal investigator for statistical analysis and qualitative analysis. RESULTS: 108 out of 177 forms were returned (61%) 77 out of 108 entered used ISBAR (71%) 31 out of the 108 entered did not use ISBAR (29%) Those who did not use ISBAR gave the following reasons: 23% prefer a different method (not specified) 23% did not want to use the method (Thought "all that information" was unnecessary) 19% reported not being trained in ISBAR technique 19% said they forgot 10% did not give a reason 6% said ISBAR is too time-consuming A Meeting of the Minds A meeting of the minds was said to have happened when there was at least a 50% or more agreement between the actions the report provider asked for and the actions the report receiver actually reported hearing. When ISBAR was not used, there was a meeting of the minds only 23% of the time. When ISBAR was used, there was a meeting of the minds 58% of the time. Using a 2x2 Chi Square Test of Proportions this difference was shown to be statistically significant. Chi-Square compares the observed and expected frequencies in a cross-tabulation. X2 (df = 1) = 9.99 P = .0016 The chance of important information being heard and understood by the report receiver is significantly increased when the ISBAR technique is used. CONCLUSIONS: Discussion / Application to Practice: Using ISBAR technique does improve the success of hand-off communications in healthcare. Further education and/or remediation is needed, with an emphasis on providing recommendations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Exploratory, descriptive pilot study to examine the quality of hand-offs reports using the ISBAR technique.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorZafian, Ruthannen_GB
dc.author.detailsRuthann Zafian, email: rzafian@harthosp.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157175-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/RESEARCH QUESTIONS: To determine if staff members who have been taught the ISBAR hand-off technique are using the technique for hand-off reports. To examine the effectiveness of hand-off reports when ISBAR is used and when it is not used. Purpose & Rationale: Communication of information that is timely, accurate, complete and directive between healthcare providers is essential to quality patient care. ISBAR is a type of hand-off report technique that healthcare providers can use to improve the quality of their hand-off reports. This institution implemented this hand-off technique in the Fall of 2006. One year later, the task-force who chose ISBAR needed to quantify and qualify the use of the ISBAR technique amongst its staff. BACKGROUND: Literature Review Synthesis: As identified by the Joint Commission in their publication: Patient Safety Solutions, Communication breakdowns were the leading cause of sentinel events in the United States between 1995 and 2006. Healthcare hand-off best practice techniques and processes have not yet been established, however lessons can be taken from other industries. The use of a common communication technique such as SBAR, used initially in the military and the aviation industries provides one such lesson. Though articles regarding the use SBAR are common in current healthcare literature, research studies regarding its use and effects are rare. METHODS / PROCEDURES: RN Clinical leaders from the department of Nursing and leaders from other departments who were previously trained in the ISBAR technique, were re-educated regarding use of the ISBAR technique, the data collection process for this study and the use of the evaluation tool. They were then asked to witness 5 hand-off reports over a two month period. Prior to witnessing the report, verbal consent of the 2 parties was obtained. When the hand-off report was complete, the interviewer interviewed the provider of the report and the recipient of the report. Completed data collection forms were returned to the principal investigator for statistical analysis and qualitative analysis. RESULTS: 108 out of 177 forms were returned (61%) 77 out of 108 entered used ISBAR (71%) 31 out of the 108 entered did not use ISBAR (29%) Those who did not use ISBAR gave the following reasons: 23% prefer a different method (not specified) 23% did not want to use the method (Thought "all that information" was unnecessary) 19% reported not being trained in ISBAR technique 19% said they forgot 10% did not give a reason 6% said ISBAR is too time-consuming A Meeting of the Minds A meeting of the minds was said to have happened when there was at least a 50% or more agreement between the actions the report provider asked for and the actions the report receiver actually reported hearing. When ISBAR was not used, there was a meeting of the minds only 23% of the time. When ISBAR was used, there was a meeting of the minds 58% of the time. Using a 2x2 Chi Square Test of Proportions this difference was shown to be statistically significant. Chi-Square compares the observed and expected frequencies in a cross-tabulation. X2 (df = 1) = 9.99 P = .0016 The chance of important information being heard and understood by the report receiver is significantly increased when the ISBAR technique is used. CONCLUSIONS: Discussion / Application to Practice: Using ISBAR technique does improve the success of hand-off communications in healthcare. Further education and/or remediation is needed, with an emphasis on providing recommendations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:29:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:29:18Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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