2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157177
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Earplugs Improve the Subjective Experience of Sleep for Citical Care Patients
Author(s):
Scotto, Carrie; McClusky, Carol
Author Details:
Carrie Scotto, Summa Health Systems, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, USA, email: cscotto@uakron.edu; Carol McClusky
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The goal of this study was to explore the effects of earplug use on the subjective experience of sleep for patients in critical care BACKGROUND: The negative effects of noise in critical care include sleep disturbances, increased stress response, and reduced patient satisfaction. The nature of critical care often precludes quiet time protocols. Previous studies indicate that the use of earplugs can improve REM sleep and sleep efficiency. This study examined the effects of earplugs as a non-invasive method for improving the subjective sleep experience and increasing patient comfort and satisfaction. METHODS: This quasi-experimental study recruited non-ventilated, non-sedated adults admitted to critical care and randomly assigned them to the intervention or control group. The intervention group used earplugs during night time sleep hours allowing short term removal during patient care. Before 12 noon the next day all subjects completed the Verran-Snyder-Halpern Sleep Scale, an 8-question visual analogue scale, to describe their subjective response to sleep. T-tests were used to detect differences between the intervention and control group scores. RESULTS: Eighty-eight participants (49 intervention, 39 control) completed the study. Mean age 63, 56% males (49), 93% Caucasian (81). Total sleep satisfaction scores were significantly better for the intervention group (p = .002). Seven of the subjective categories were independently significant (p = .005-.044). One category, satisfaction with the amount of time needed to fall asleep, was not significant (p = .111). CONCLUSIONS: Earplug use improved the subjective experience of sleep for this group of critical care patients without interfering with care delivery. The intervention group did not make use of sedation and hypnotic medications and still reported more satisfaction with sleep. This low cost, non-invasive method should be made available to patients to increase satisfaction with their sleep experience.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEarplugs Improve the Subjective Experience of Sleep for Citical Care Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorScotto, Carrieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcClusky, Carolen_GB
dc.author.detailsCarrie Scotto, Summa Health Systems, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, USA, email: cscotto@uakron.edu; Carol McCluskyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157177-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The goal of this study was to explore the effects of earplug use on the subjective experience of sleep for patients in critical care BACKGROUND: The negative effects of noise in critical care include sleep disturbances, increased stress response, and reduced patient satisfaction. The nature of critical care often precludes quiet time protocols. Previous studies indicate that the use of earplugs can improve REM sleep and sleep efficiency. This study examined the effects of earplugs as a non-invasive method for improving the subjective sleep experience and increasing patient comfort and satisfaction. METHODS: This quasi-experimental study recruited non-ventilated, non-sedated adults admitted to critical care and randomly assigned them to the intervention or control group. The intervention group used earplugs during night time sleep hours allowing short term removal during patient care. Before 12 noon the next day all subjects completed the Verran-Snyder-Halpern Sleep Scale, an 8-question visual analogue scale, to describe their subjective response to sleep. T-tests were used to detect differences between the intervention and control group scores. RESULTS: Eighty-eight participants (49 intervention, 39 control) completed the study. Mean age 63, 56% males (49), 93% Caucasian (81). Total sleep satisfaction scores were significantly better for the intervention group (p = .002). Seven of the subjective categories were independently significant (p = .005-.044). One category, satisfaction with the amount of time needed to fall asleep, was not significant (p = .111). CONCLUSIONS: Earplug use improved the subjective experience of sleep for this group of critical care patients without interfering with care delivery. The intervention group did not make use of sedation and hypnotic medications and still reported more satisfaction with sleep. This low cost, non-invasive method should be made available to patients to increase satisfaction with their sleep experience.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:29:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:29:24Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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