2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157183
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Working in an eICU Unit: Life in the Box
Author(s):
Stafford, Trudi; Myers, Mary; Young, Anne; Foster, Janet; Huber, Jeffrey
Author Details:
Trudi Stafford, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center - Passavant, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: staffordtb@upmc.edu; Mary Myers; Anne Young; Janet Foster; Jeffrey Huber
Abstract:
PURPOSE: This ethnographic study of the VISICU eICU (Baltimore, MD) work environment in a large Midwestern healthcare system describes everyday life working in a telemedicine intensive care. BACKGROUND: The eICU telemedicine model of care uses technology to provide intensivist-driven care in settings without bedside intensivist coverage. Previous studies of the eICU model of care mainly focus on quantitative elements evaluating specific clinical outcomes. This study examined the way such units function. METHODS: Data were gathered through 60 hours of observation and formal interviews of eClinician team members. Thirteen eNurses, three ePhysicians, and one IT Systems Analyst participated in semi-structured interviews and twenty-seven additional eClinicians participated in the field study. Years of clinical experience and experience in critical care ranged from 5 years to over 30 years. RESULTS: Findings concluded that the eICU work environment is like working in an air traffic control center. eClinicians work at computer screens monitoring multiple ICU patients. The eClinician has access to information that is not always readily available to the bedside team. The eClinician provides this information and recommendations for interactions to the bedside team who has hands-on control to change the course of events. Effective communication and interactions between the eClinicians and the bedside team are critical to the success of this practice model. CONCLUSIONS: The eICU model of care is a viable way to provide experienced ICU nurses and intensivists to supplement the bedside team. The work environment provides a way for eNurses to continue to use their critical thinking skills and ICU experience in a setting with less physical demands than bedside ICU nursing. The ePhysicians find value in the eICU model of care from a patient safety and cost avoidance perspective but admit that the ideal care model includes an intensivist at the bedside. Further study is needed to describe the eICU care model from the perspective of the bedside ICU team. This perspective is needed in order to determine how to develop appropriate protocols, policies, communication plans, and practices that will ensure ongoing effective collaboration between the two entities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorking in an eICU Unit: Life in the Boxen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStafford, Trudien_GB
dc.contributor.authorMyers, Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Anneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFoster, Janeten_GB
dc.contributor.authorHuber, Jeffreyen_GB
dc.author.detailsTrudi Stafford, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center - Passavant, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: staffordtb@upmc.edu; Mary Myers; Anne Young; Janet Foster; Jeffrey Huberen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157183-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: This ethnographic study of the VISICU eICU (Baltimore, MD) work environment in a large Midwestern healthcare system describes everyday life working in a telemedicine intensive care. BACKGROUND: The eICU telemedicine model of care uses technology to provide intensivist-driven care in settings without bedside intensivist coverage. Previous studies of the eICU model of care mainly focus on quantitative elements evaluating specific clinical outcomes. This study examined the way such units function. METHODS: Data were gathered through 60 hours of observation and formal interviews of eClinician team members. Thirteen eNurses, three ePhysicians, and one IT Systems Analyst participated in semi-structured interviews and twenty-seven additional eClinicians participated in the field study. Years of clinical experience and experience in critical care ranged from 5 years to over 30 years. RESULTS: Findings concluded that the eICU work environment is like working in an air traffic control center. eClinicians work at computer screens monitoring multiple ICU patients. The eClinician has access to information that is not always readily available to the bedside team. The eClinician provides this information and recommendations for interactions to the bedside team who has hands-on control to change the course of events. Effective communication and interactions between the eClinicians and the bedside team are critical to the success of this practice model. CONCLUSIONS: The eICU model of care is a viable way to provide experienced ICU nurses and intensivists to supplement the bedside team. The work environment provides a way for eNurses to continue to use their critical thinking skills and ICU experience in a setting with less physical demands than bedside ICU nursing. The ePhysicians find value in the eICU model of care from a patient safety and cost avoidance perspective but admit that the ideal care model includes an intensivist at the bedside. Further study is needed to describe the eICU care model from the perspective of the bedside ICU team. This perspective is needed in order to determine how to develop appropriate protocols, policies, communication plans, and practices that will ensure ongoing effective collaboration between the two entities.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:29:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:29:45Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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