Eating our Young is Over: Graduate Nurse Addition in a Large Tertiary Cardiac Intensive Care Unit Using a Team Approach

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157184
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Eating our Young is Over: Graduate Nurse Addition in a Large Tertiary Cardiac Intensive Care Unit Using a Team Approach
Author(s):
Stewart, Jena; Danchus, Kimberly; Fritts, Felicia; Gillen, Patricia; Johnson, Joshlyn; Kramer, Jeanne; Davinroy, Dennis; O'Hearne, Bridget; Kopf, Kathleen; Sudbrock, Kimberly
Author Details:
Jena Stewart, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, email: jjs9256@bjc.org; Kimberly Danchus; Felicia Fritts; Patricia Gillen; Joshlyn Johnson; Jeanne Kramer; Dennis Davinroy; Bridget O'Hearne; Kathleen Kopf; Kimberly Sudbrock
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The Coronary Intensive Care Unit (CICU) intended to fill a large vacancy rate by introducing graduate nurses into a high acuity environment and nursing staff with greater than 10 years of experience. Leadership and staff had to change candidate selection and orientation format to forge success. The staff was challenged to provide a successful orientation for graduate nurses amidst high vacancy, limited preceptors, and broad age differences and experience levels between groups. Description: The CICU at a large tertiary urban hospital serves severely compromised, hemodynamically unstable cardiac patients. Recruitment and retention had been a challenge with few experienced applicants. Seasoned staff was skeptical of the feasibility of graduate nurse success at skill acquisition and commitment to the unit. By 2007, the vacancy rate had exceeded 30%. Leadership responded by changing the interview and selection process. Candidates shadowed seasoned nurses before an offer was extended. Employment offers were extended based on previous unlicensed technician experience, recommendation, level of commitment to the unit, and staff input. As a result, a total of five inexperienced nurses (four graduates and one with < 1 year of experience) were selected and assigned preceptors. The average age difference between orientee and preceptor was 18.1 years (average age 25.2 to 43.3 years). Preceptors had an average of 18.25 years experience. A unit based Clinical Nurse Specialist was added to assist with mentoring orientees, preceptors, and complex patient management. Lead charge nurses were challenged daily to make assignments that would provide opportunities without compromising safety. EVALUATION: All five inexperienced staff successfully completed 12 weeks of orientation and were trained to safely function by the end of 2007. All five are employed in the CICU over a year later. The success was due to a team approach and staff inclusion in interviewing, selection, and mentoring of candidates. Although the new staff was much younger, they were mature, motivated, and self-directed learners, not easily intimidated. Over time, all staff not only preceptors, were mentoring the new staff. Due to acuity, and necessity, there was no time to eat the young. Experienced and inexperienced staff was able to bridge age and experience gaps. Eating our young is finally over.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEating our Young is Over: Graduate Nurse Addition in a Large Tertiary Cardiac Intensive Care Unit Using a Team Approachen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Jenaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDanchus, Kimberlyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFritts, Feliciaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGillen, Patriciaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Joshlynen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKramer, Jeanneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDavinroy, Dennisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Hearne, Bridgeten_GB
dc.contributor.authorKopf, Kathleenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSudbrock, Kimberlyen_GB
dc.author.detailsJena Stewart, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, email: jjs9256@bjc.org; Kimberly Danchus; Felicia Fritts; Patricia Gillen; Joshlyn Johnson; Jeanne Kramer; Dennis Davinroy; Bridget O'Hearne; Kathleen Kopf; Kimberly Sudbrocken_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157184-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The Coronary Intensive Care Unit (CICU) intended to fill a large vacancy rate by introducing graduate nurses into a high acuity environment and nursing staff with greater than 10 years of experience. Leadership and staff had to change candidate selection and orientation format to forge success. The staff was challenged to provide a successful orientation for graduate nurses amidst high vacancy, limited preceptors, and broad age differences and experience levels between groups. Description: The CICU at a large tertiary urban hospital serves severely compromised, hemodynamically unstable cardiac patients. Recruitment and retention had been a challenge with few experienced applicants. Seasoned staff was skeptical of the feasibility of graduate nurse success at skill acquisition and commitment to the unit. By 2007, the vacancy rate had exceeded 30%. Leadership responded by changing the interview and selection process. Candidates shadowed seasoned nurses before an offer was extended. Employment offers were extended based on previous unlicensed technician experience, recommendation, level of commitment to the unit, and staff input. As a result, a total of five inexperienced nurses (four graduates and one with < 1 year of experience) were selected and assigned preceptors. The average age difference between orientee and preceptor was 18.1 years (average age 25.2 to 43.3 years). Preceptors had an average of 18.25 years experience. A unit based Clinical Nurse Specialist was added to assist with mentoring orientees, preceptors, and complex patient management. Lead charge nurses were challenged daily to make assignments that would provide opportunities without compromising safety. EVALUATION: All five inexperienced staff successfully completed 12 weeks of orientation and were trained to safely function by the end of 2007. All five are employed in the CICU over a year later. The success was due to a team approach and staff inclusion in interviewing, selection, and mentoring of candidates. Although the new staff was much younger, they were mature, motivated, and self-directed learners, not easily intimidated. Over time, all staff not only preceptors, were mentoring the new staff. Due to acuity, and necessity, there was no time to eat the young. Experienced and inexperienced staff was able to bridge age and experience gaps. Eating our young is finally over.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:29:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:29:48Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.