Interrater reliability of Japanese version of Richmond Agitation - Sedation Scale in various ICU patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157186
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interrater reliability of Japanese version of Richmond Agitation - Sedation Scale in various ICU patients
Author(s):
Unoki, Takeshi; Sakuramoto, Hideaki; Okimura, Aiko; Takeshima, Chiharu; Yanagisawa, Yaeko; Tamura, Fumiko; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Mochizuki, Toshiaki; Otani, Norio
Author Details:
Takeshi Unoki, St. Luke's College of Nursing, Tokyo, Japan, email: tunoki@slcn.ac.jp; Hideaki Sakuramoto; Aiko Okimura; Chiharu Takeshima; Yaeko Yanagisawa; Fumiko Tamura; Kazuhiro Aoki; Toshiaki Mochizuki; Norio Otani
Abstract:
PURPOSE: To develop a Japanese version of the Richmond Agitation - Sedation Scale (RASS) and evaluate interrater reliability of it in various ICU patients. BACKGROUND: It is essential to objectively assess sedation and/or agitation status to maintain patients' comfort and safety. RASS is relatively new sedation scale originally developed by Curtis N. Sessler and his colleagues in the U.S. and has been examined from its validity and reliability; however, there is no validated Japanese version of RASS. METHODS: We developed a Japanese version of RASS using back-translation method. Original English-written RASS was translated in Japanese and a professional translator back-translated it to English. We compared original and back-translated RASS in terms of semantic equivalent, acceptability, comprehensibility, and appropriateness. This process was repeated in three times. Finally, original author (C.N.S.) confirmed that both RASS were linguistically equivalent in terms of clinical use. Then, paired evaluators simultaneously and independently evaluated depth of sedation using the Japanese RASS in convenience samples of ICU patients to evaluate interrater reliability. RESULTS: Twenty-nine ICU patients were examined a total of 92 times by evaluator pairs, resulting in 184 observations. Thirty-one percent of observation was RASS 0, while 62% of it was less than 0 of RASS. Percentage of observations under sedation and mechanical ventilation were 47% and 84% respectively. Thirty-nine observations were with neurological injury / disease. Agreement in all observations was excellent (weighted k = 0.8). In subgroup analysis, excellent agreement was seen in non-sedated (weighted k = 0.8) and neurological injury / disease (weighted k = 0.9) patients. CONCLUSIONS: Japanese version of RASS was highly reliable in various ICU patients including non-sedated patients and patients with neurological injury / disease.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInterrater reliability of Japanese version of Richmond Agitation - Sedation Scale in various ICU patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorUnoki, Takeshien_GB
dc.contributor.authorSakuramoto, Hideakien_GB
dc.contributor.authorOkimura, Aikoen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTakeshima, Chiharuen_GB
dc.contributor.authorYanagisawa, Yaekoen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTamura, Fumikoen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAoki, Kazuhiroen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMochizuki, Toshiakien_GB
dc.contributor.authorOtani, Norioen_GB
dc.author.detailsTakeshi Unoki, St. Luke's College of Nursing, Tokyo, Japan, email: tunoki@slcn.ac.jp; Hideaki Sakuramoto; Aiko Okimura; Chiharu Takeshima; Yaeko Yanagisawa; Fumiko Tamura; Kazuhiro Aoki; Toshiaki Mochizuki; Norio Otanien_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157186-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To develop a Japanese version of the Richmond Agitation - Sedation Scale (RASS) and evaluate interrater reliability of it in various ICU patients. BACKGROUND: It is essential to objectively assess sedation and/or agitation status to maintain patients' comfort and safety. RASS is relatively new sedation scale originally developed by Curtis N. Sessler and his colleagues in the U.S. and has been examined from its validity and reliability; however, there is no validated Japanese version of RASS. METHODS: We developed a Japanese version of RASS using back-translation method. Original English-written RASS was translated in Japanese and a professional translator back-translated it to English. We compared original and back-translated RASS in terms of semantic equivalent, acceptability, comprehensibility, and appropriateness. This process was repeated in three times. Finally, original author (C.N.S.) confirmed that both RASS were linguistically equivalent in terms of clinical use. Then, paired evaluators simultaneously and independently evaluated depth of sedation using the Japanese RASS in convenience samples of ICU patients to evaluate interrater reliability. RESULTS: Twenty-nine ICU patients were examined a total of 92 times by evaluator pairs, resulting in 184 observations. Thirty-one percent of observation was RASS 0, while 62% of it was less than 0 of RASS. Percentage of observations under sedation and mechanical ventilation were 47% and 84% respectively. Thirty-nine observations were with neurological injury / disease. Agreement in all observations was excellent (weighted k = 0.8). In subgroup analysis, excellent agreement was seen in non-sedated (weighted k = 0.8) and neurological injury / disease (weighted k = 0.9) patients. CONCLUSIONS: Japanese version of RASS was highly reliable in various ICU patients including non-sedated patients and patients with neurological injury / disease.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:29:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:29:55Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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