2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157187
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of a Dedicated IV Team
Author(s):
Wagner, Julia
Author Details:
Julia Wagner, Denver VA Medical Center, Denver, Colorado, USA, email: julia.wagner@va.gov
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) are a costly risk associated with central venous catheters both in terms of monetary expenditures and patient outcomes. Patients with CR-BSI experience increased length of stay, higher morbidity and mortality rates, and increased pain and suffering. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dedicated IV Team in reducing catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI) rates and improving patient satisfaction. Description: A dedicated IV Team was established utilizing input from the other hospital departments to determine the structure, purpose and responsibilities of the team. Team duties include surveillance, care, and maintenance of all vascular access devices in the in-patient setting, education of IV practices, and data collection. Viability of all central lines is ensured by assessing patency and treating with thrombolytics if indicated. The team was trained in utilizing ultrasound to place peripheral IVs for very difficult placements. Between December 2007 and May 2008 the IV Team collected data during the course of their daily duties including the number of patients seen, new IV catheters placed, central line dressings changed, central lines removed, peripheral and central lines in place, expired IVs and dressings, thrombolytic therapies required, and lab draws from central lines. Infection Surveillance Data were collected and analyzed monthly by the Infection Control Department based on national guidelines. Descriptive statistics were performed to explore the impact of IV team implementation and CRBSIs. EVALUATION: A total of 7,787 patients were seen by the IV team between December and May. The rates of infection per 1,000 catheter days during this time period were 6.3, 6.6, 4.7, 7.8, 1.8, and 1.3, respectively. Preliminarily, there has been a downward trend in the rate of CR-BSI in April and May 2008. The rate has gone from being unacceptably high to below the national average. While the program is still young, the positive outcomes of the implementation of the IV Team are becoming apparent. Initially, data collection was sporadic due to the team not being fully staffed. More data over the next year will provide a better picture of the effectiveness but the preliminary results are positive.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of a Dedicated IV Teamen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWagner, Juliaen_GB
dc.author.detailsJulia Wagner, Denver VA Medical Center, Denver, Colorado, USA, email: julia.wagner@va.goven_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157187-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) are a costly risk associated with central venous catheters both in terms of monetary expenditures and patient outcomes. Patients with CR-BSI experience increased length of stay, higher morbidity and mortality rates, and increased pain and suffering. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dedicated IV Team in reducing catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI) rates and improving patient satisfaction. Description: A dedicated IV Team was established utilizing input from the other hospital departments to determine the structure, purpose and responsibilities of the team. Team duties include surveillance, care, and maintenance of all vascular access devices in the in-patient setting, education of IV practices, and data collection. Viability of all central lines is ensured by assessing patency and treating with thrombolytics if indicated. The team was trained in utilizing ultrasound to place peripheral IVs for very difficult placements. Between December 2007 and May 2008 the IV Team collected data during the course of their daily duties including the number of patients seen, new IV catheters placed, central line dressings changed, central lines removed, peripheral and central lines in place, expired IVs and dressings, thrombolytic therapies required, and lab draws from central lines. Infection Surveillance Data were collected and analyzed monthly by the Infection Control Department based on national guidelines. Descriptive statistics were performed to explore the impact of IV team implementation and CRBSIs. EVALUATION: A total of 7,787 patients were seen by the IV team between December and May. The rates of infection per 1,000 catheter days during this time period were 6.3, 6.6, 4.7, 7.8, 1.8, and 1.3, respectively. Preliminarily, there has been a downward trend in the rate of CR-BSI in April and May 2008. The rate has gone from being unacceptably high to below the national average. While the program is still young, the positive outcomes of the implementation of the IV Team are becoming apparent. Initially, data collection was sporadic due to the team not being fully staffed. More data over the next year will provide a better picture of the effectiveness but the preliminary results are positive.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:29:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:29:58Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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