2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157191
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Survey Says: Nursing Values and Behaviors with End-Of-Life care in the ICU
Author(s):
Zomorodi, Meg; Riemen, Kristina; Lynn, Mary
Author Details:
Meg Zomorodi, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: meg_zomorodi@unc.edu; Kristina Riemen; Mary Lynn
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to measure nursing values and behaviors when providing end-of-life care. BACKGROUND: Although the ICU is typically viewed as a critical and life saving environment, many patients receive end of life care there. For nurses whose day-to-day practice is focused on saving lives, the transition from intensive care to end-of-life care can be difficult. Nurses are in a pivotal position to improve care for dying patients and their families by redefining the perspective of ICU care and challenging current practice. METHODS: This study consisted of three phases. Phase I consisted of item development from a content analysis of the literature and qualitative interviews. Phase II consisted of content validity assessment and pilot testing. Phase III consisted of field testing, factor analysis, and reliability estimation. RESULTS: Items generated in Phase I were evaluated in Phase II by content experts (n = 8)and pilot participants (n = 12), and two instruments were developed. In Phase III, the Values of Intensive Care Nurses for End-of-Life (INTEL-Values) was subjected to an exploratory factor analysis (n = 695) and a four factor model was selected. The Behaviors of Intensive Care Nurses for End-of-Life (INTEL-Behaviors) was also examined through a factor analysis (n = 682), and a two factor model was selected. Reliability testing of both instruments over a two week period yielded low Kappa values (.05 - .40) although the Pearson's correlations (.68 - .81) and intra-class correlation coefficients were high (.65-.81). CONCLUSIONS: The INTEL-Values was problematic in terms of item to item correlations and test-retest reliability. This might be partially attributable to the recognized difficulty in measuring attitudes. The INTEL-Behaviors had higher factor loadings, possibly because behaviors are more concrete. Future work will consist of continued refinement of the instruments and construct validity testing. Nurses who participated in this study stressed the importance of continued work in this area.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSurvey Says: Nursing Values and Behaviors with End-Of-Life care in the ICUen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZomorodi, Megen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRiemen, Kristinaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLynn, Maryen_GB
dc.author.detailsMeg Zomorodi, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: meg_zomorodi@unc.edu; Kristina Riemen; Mary Lynnen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157191-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to measure nursing values and behaviors when providing end-of-life care. BACKGROUND: Although the ICU is typically viewed as a critical and life saving environment, many patients receive end of life care there. For nurses whose day-to-day practice is focused on saving lives, the transition from intensive care to end-of-life care can be difficult. Nurses are in a pivotal position to improve care for dying patients and their families by redefining the perspective of ICU care and challenging current practice. METHODS: This study consisted of three phases. Phase I consisted of item development from a content analysis of the literature and qualitative interviews. Phase II consisted of content validity assessment and pilot testing. Phase III consisted of field testing, factor analysis, and reliability estimation. RESULTS: Items generated in Phase I were evaluated in Phase II by content experts (n = 8)and pilot participants (n = 12), and two instruments were developed. In Phase III, the Values of Intensive Care Nurses for End-of-Life (INTEL-Values) was subjected to an exploratory factor analysis (n = 695) and a four factor model was selected. The Behaviors of Intensive Care Nurses for End-of-Life (INTEL-Behaviors) was also examined through a factor analysis (n = 682), and a two factor model was selected. Reliability testing of both instruments over a two week period yielded low Kappa values (.05 - .40) although the Pearson's correlations (.68 - .81) and intra-class correlation coefficients were high (.65-.81). CONCLUSIONS: The INTEL-Values was problematic in terms of item to item correlations and test-retest reliability. This might be partially attributable to the recognized difficulty in measuring attitudes. The INTEL-Behaviors had higher factor loadings, possibly because behaviors are more concrete. Future work will consist of continued refinement of the instruments and construct validity testing. Nurses who participated in this study stressed the importance of continued work in this area.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:30:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:30:12Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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