2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157201
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Human Simulation: Impact on the Development of Clinical Judgment
Abstract:
Human Simulation: Impact on the Development of Clinical Judgment
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Lasater, Kathie, EdD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University School of Nursing, SN-4S
Title:Assistant Professor
Rationale: Despite the current pressures on nursing education and rapidly changing nursing roles, accrediting bodies and the workplace are expecting graduates to have excellent clinical judgment skills. Many programs of nursing are investing capital in resources such as human patient simulators in order to extend clinical practica experiences. However, little research exists that evaluates the impact of this type of simulation on the development of students' clinical judgment. Purpose: This exploratory, mixed methods study examined the impact of simulation on the development of clinical judgment in an undergraduate program. The study focused on students enrolled in the first course of OHSU's first term, using simulation as a weekly requirement for clinical practicum. Four study perspectives-confidence, aptitude, experience and skill-all of which point to clinical judgment development, were examined. Methods: Survey methods were used to evaluate 39 junior and 44 senior volunteer students' confidence in applying clinical judgment to their practices at the beginning and end of a term. Similarly, the CCTDI was administered to 39 junior and 50 senior students to determine aptitude to critically think. Eight students from the course using simulation formed a focus group, examining the experiences of those engaged in weekly simulation, and expert observations as well as the development of a quantitative scoring rubric explored the clinical judgment skill of 47 junior simulation students. Results: Junior level students had statistically significant differences in their confidence levels (p < .05), with those juniors who spent one clinical day in the simulation lab in lieu of a clinical day scoring higher. There were no statistically significant differences found in any of the quantitative analyses between traditional and nontraditio nal students or those with past healthcare experience. The focus group participants corroborated this type of simulation as a strategy that helped them to "integrate" their learning from reading, skills lab, and clinical practice, transfer learning from the simulation lab to the clinical area, and critically think. One new quantitative instrument emerged from this study, and another was further refined during the study timeframe. Implications: The findings from this mixed methods study suggest that human patient simulation has the potential to extend students' practice of clinical judgment in a low-risk setting where immediate feedback is available to assist students. Larger studies are needed in a variety of nursing education settings to validate this implication. The instruments developed during and refined by this study may assist other programs to further evaluate the impact of high fidelity simulation on students' clinical judgment development.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHuman Simulation: Impact on the Development of Clinical Judgmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157201-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Human Simulation: Impact on the Development of Clinical Judgment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lasater, Kathie, EdD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University School of Nursing, SN-4S</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lasaterk@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Rationale: Despite the current pressures on nursing education and rapidly changing nursing roles, accrediting bodies and the workplace are expecting graduates to have excellent clinical judgment skills. Many programs of nursing are investing capital in resources such as human patient simulators in order to extend clinical practica experiences. However, little research exists that evaluates the impact of this type of simulation on the development of students' clinical judgment. Purpose: This exploratory, mixed methods study examined the impact of simulation on the development of clinical judgment in an undergraduate program. The study focused on students enrolled in the first course of OHSU's first term, using simulation as a weekly requirement for clinical practicum. Four study perspectives-confidence, aptitude, experience and skill-all of which point to clinical judgment development, were examined. Methods: Survey methods were used to evaluate 39 junior and 44 senior volunteer students' confidence in applying clinical judgment to their practices at the beginning and end of a term. Similarly, the CCTDI was administered to 39 junior and 50 senior students to determine aptitude to critically think. Eight students from the course using simulation formed a focus group, examining the experiences of those engaged in weekly simulation, and expert observations as well as the development of a quantitative scoring rubric explored the clinical judgment skill of 47 junior simulation students. Results: Junior level students had statistically significant differences in their confidence levels (p &lt; .05), with those juniors who spent one clinical day in the simulation lab in lieu of a clinical day scoring higher. There were no statistically significant differences found in any of the quantitative analyses between traditional and nontraditio nal students or those with past healthcare experience. The focus group participants corroborated this type of simulation as a strategy that helped them to &quot;integrate&quot; their learning from reading, skills lab, and clinical practice, transfer learning from the simulation lab to the clinical area, and critically think. One new quantitative instrument emerged from this study, and another was further refined during the study timeframe. Implications: The findings from this mixed methods study suggest that human patient simulation has the potential to extend students' practice of clinical judgment in a low-risk setting where immediate feedback is available to assist students. Larger studies are needed in a variety of nursing education settings to validate this implication. The instruments developed during and refined by this study may assist other programs to further evaluate the impact of high fidelity simulation on students' clinical judgment development.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:39:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:39:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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