2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157204
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding Mental Health Problems in Asian Americans
Abstract:
Understanding Mental Health Problems in Asian Americans
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Rungruangkonkit, Sangjan, ARNP, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:of Washington
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:Box 395757, 325 9th Avenue S., Seattle, WA, 98040, USA
Contact Telephone:206-275-3747
Co-Authors:Michael G. Kennedy
Purpose/Aims: 1. To describe the characteristics of Asian American and Pacific Islander consumers of language and culture-specific mental health services at two points in time over a 5 year period; 2. To examine changes in language and culture-specific mental health services provided to Asian American and Pacific Islanders over a 5 year period as a result of changing community needs. Background: Asian Americans are one of the fastest growing ethnic populations in the United States (U.S.), currently numbering 10.9 million, or 4% of the total U.S. population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2000; Humes & McKinnon, 2000). There is a distinct lack of data on the incidence of psychiatric disorders and the utilization of available mental health services among Asian Americans (Herrick & Brown, 1999). Most studies tend to homogenize Asian populations, ignoring significant differences in culture, language and history (Browne, Fong, et al. 1994). Few studies have attempted to explore the differences in cultural adjustment and mental health problems among these various cultural groups. Failure to do so ignores knowledge essential to understanding mental health needs and issues related to providing culturally appropriate mental health services. Methods: The design of the present study is an exploratory analysis of an archival-based descriptive data set. It is a case analysis of an ethnic-specific Asian American community's mental health program in Seattle, Washington. Computerized data on all consumers enrolled in the mental health program were selected at two points 5 years apart. Both demographic and clinical data were analyzed, including DSM-IV diagnoses, time in treatment, substance use and treatment and participation in group therapies. Only aggregated data were collected and analyzed by using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software program. Results: The results show the majority of clients require language interpreter services. Time in treatment ranged from 1-7 years. Cambodian and Mien remain in treatment the longest. Most of clients are unemployed and live below the poverty line (<$10,000/year). Schizophrenia and Bipolar are most common diagnoses among non-refugee groups. Major depression and PTSD are most common diagnoses among Southeast Asian refugees. Group treatment is most common among Southeast Asians, especially Mien. Implications: Asian Americans are a heterogeneous group. Mental health problems are different in each ethnic group. The results provided a baseline of information that allows subsequent research to confirm or contrast proposed theories, and positively for comprehensive theories development. The longitudinal perspective of this study can provide critical information for program planning, public policy making and resource/grant allocation related to either one specific Asian sub-group or collectively as the Asian American cluster. Finally, comparable data about the Asian Americans is available to shed light on the existing monocultural perspective in psychology.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding Mental Health Problems in Asian Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157204-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Understanding Mental Health Problems in Asian Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rungruangkonkit, Sangjan, ARNP, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 395757, 325 9th Avenue S., Seattle, WA, 98040, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-275-3747</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sangjan@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michael G. Kennedy</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: 1. To describe the characteristics of Asian American and Pacific Islander consumers of language and culture-specific mental health services at two points in time over a 5 year period; 2. To examine changes in language and culture-specific mental health services provided to Asian American and Pacific Islanders over a 5 year period as a result of changing community needs. Background: Asian Americans are one of the fastest growing ethnic populations in the United States (U.S.), currently numbering 10.9 million, or 4% of the total U.S. population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2000; Humes &amp; McKinnon, 2000). There is a distinct lack of data on the incidence of psychiatric disorders and the utilization of available mental health services among Asian Americans (Herrick &amp; Brown, 1999). Most studies tend to homogenize Asian populations, ignoring significant differences in culture, language and history (Browne, Fong, et al. 1994). Few studies have attempted to explore the differences in cultural adjustment and mental health problems among these various cultural groups. Failure to do so ignores knowledge essential to understanding mental health needs and issues related to providing culturally appropriate mental health services. Methods: The design of the present study is an exploratory analysis of an archival-based descriptive data set. It is a case analysis of an ethnic-specific Asian American community's mental health program in Seattle, Washington. Computerized data on all consumers enrolled in the mental health program were selected at two points 5 years apart. Both demographic and clinical data were analyzed, including DSM-IV diagnoses, time in treatment, substance use and treatment and participation in group therapies. Only aggregated data were collected and analyzed by using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software program. Results: The results show the majority of clients require language interpreter services. Time in treatment ranged from 1-7 years. Cambodian and Mien remain in treatment the longest. Most of clients are unemployed and live below the poverty line (&lt;$10,000/year). Schizophrenia and Bipolar are most common diagnoses among non-refugee groups. Major depression and PTSD are most common diagnoses among Southeast Asian refugees. Group treatment is most common among Southeast Asians, especially Mien. Implications: Asian Americans are a heterogeneous group. Mental health problems are different in each ethnic group. The results provided a baseline of information that allows subsequent research to confirm or contrast proposed theories, and positively for comprehensive theories development. The longitudinal perspective of this study can provide critical information for program planning, public policy making and resource/grant allocation related to either one specific Asian sub-group or collectively as the Asian American cluster. Finally, comparable data about the Asian Americans is available to shed light on the existing monocultural perspective in psychology.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:39:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:39:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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