2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157205
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Complementary Therapy, Chronic Illness and Older Rural Dwellers
Abstract:
Complementary Therapy, Chronic Illness and Older Rural Dwellers
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Shreffler-Grant, Jean, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University - Bozeman College of Nursing-Missoula Campus
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT, 59812, USA
Contact Telephone:406-243-2540
Co-Authors:Elizabeth G. Nichols, Therese Sullivan, Clarann Weinert, Bette A. Ide
Purposes/Aims: The aim of this study was to increase the understanding of the extent and purpose of the use of complementary therapies, to ascertain the perception of the efficacy of the selected therapy, and to explore awareness of the availability of complementary providers. Rationale/Background: Strategies used by older rural dwellers to manage chronic illness are affected by several factors including the availability of, and knowledge about, treatment options. In a prior study the research team demonstrated that rural elderly used complementary and alternative therapies at about the same rate as did participants in other national studies. However, the data did not provide insight into why the participants engaged in particular practices, nor where they obtained information about those practices. To better understand the link between the therapy selected and the purpose for engaging in these practices a follow up study was conducted. Methods: Tape recorded telephone interviews were conducted with ten participants from the prior study who indicated two or more chronic health problems and who used a complementary therapist or had engaged in self-directed complementary practices. Results: Self-directed practices such as vitamin, mineral, and herbal supplements, aspirin, and herbal creams were most frequently used and generally were used to compensate for perceived dietary deficiencies. Participants reported inconsistent use of supplements, regulating them based on personal subjective assessment of need and timely purchasing of stock. Complementary therapies used included biofeedback, massage, chiropractic, and podiatry. Distance to therapist did not seem to be a factor in use. Respondents sought information about therapies from reliable sources such as the physician or nurse practitioner and supplemented this information with material from other sources. While respondents were satisfied with the results of the therapy, they did not always have an accurate understanding of the effects of the supplement or therapy. Implications: These respondents wanted to make informed choices and sought information to do so. They frequently perceived the health care provider to be too busy to provide adequate data and so obtained information from other sources. Inclusion of questions about the patterns of use of complementary therapies during patient history taking is essential. Patients should also be encouraged to discuss CAM use with their provider to promote appropriate and effective use of therapies being used or considered. At the very least, older individuals may be prevented from spending money on products that contribute nothing towards alleviating the symptoms they are trying to manage.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComplementary Therapy, Chronic Illness and Older Rural Dwellersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157205-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Complementary Therapy, Chronic Illness and Older Rural Dwellers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shreffler-Grant, Jean, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University - Bozeman College of Nursing-Missoula Campus</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT, 59812, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-243-2540</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jeansh@montana.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elizabeth G. Nichols, Therese Sullivan, Clarann Weinert, Bette A. Ide</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: The aim of this study was to increase the understanding of the extent and purpose of the use of complementary therapies, to ascertain the perception of the efficacy of the selected therapy, and to explore awareness of the availability of complementary providers. Rationale/Background: Strategies used by older rural dwellers to manage chronic illness are affected by several factors including the availability of, and knowledge about, treatment options. In a prior study the research team demonstrated that rural elderly used complementary and alternative therapies at about the same rate as did participants in other national studies. However, the data did not provide insight into why the participants engaged in particular practices, nor where they obtained information about those practices. To better understand the link between the therapy selected and the purpose for engaging in these practices a follow up study was conducted. Methods: Tape recorded telephone interviews were conducted with ten participants from the prior study who indicated two or more chronic health problems and who used a complementary therapist or had engaged in self-directed complementary practices. Results: Self-directed practices such as vitamin, mineral, and herbal supplements, aspirin, and herbal creams were most frequently used and generally were used to compensate for perceived dietary deficiencies. Participants reported inconsistent use of supplements, regulating them based on personal subjective assessment of need and timely purchasing of stock. Complementary therapies used included biofeedback, massage, chiropractic, and podiatry. Distance to therapist did not seem to be a factor in use. Respondents sought information about therapies from reliable sources such as the physician or nurse practitioner and supplemented this information with material from other sources. While respondents were satisfied with the results of the therapy, they did not always have an accurate understanding of the effects of the supplement or therapy. Implications: These respondents wanted to make informed choices and sought information to do so. They frequently perceived the health care provider to be too busy to provide adequate data and so obtained information from other sources. Inclusion of questions about the patterns of use of complementary therapies during patient history taking is essential. Patients should also be encouraged to discuss CAM use with their provider to promote appropriate and effective use of therapies being used or considered. At the very least, older individuals may be prevented from spending money on products that contribute nothing towards alleviating the symptoms they are trying to manage.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:39:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:39:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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