2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157206
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of Discharge Instructions by the Emergency Department Patient
Abstract:
Perceptions of Discharge Instructions by the Emergency Department Patient
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Brown, Darlene, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Title:MSN Student
Contact Address:100 Milicity Road, Henderson, NV, 89012, USA
Purpose and Aims: The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of the emergency department patient with regards to their discharge instructions. It also looks at the reasons, if any, people return to the ED for treatment and if there is any difference in these perceptions based upon gender, age, educational level or ethnicity. Background: The use of the ED is climbing at staggering numbers. For many, the ED is their only source of healthcare, with studies documenting multiple ED visits for the same patients within a 72 hour period, many for the same problem. For others, the ED is the entry portal of care. When this trend is added to that of nursing time spent with patients being compressed, one needs to look at whether this population of patients are getting the instructions they need to carry on their healthcare once they return home. This issue is further complicated by variances in the literacy levels of patients that seek care in the ED. An important aspect of nursing care is patient education that is completed in a manner that best benefits the patient. Methods: A descriptive survey study was completed on 30 adult patients that sought treatment in the ED during a time period in late summer months. Patients were approached at discharge regarding the study. If agreeable, they were given further information that included the purpose of the study along with an informational handout. Consents were obtained. These patients were then contacted one week later by telephone and were asked the questions on the Patient Survey of After-Care Instruction. Their responses were recorded by the researcher. This survey looked at various dimensions of the discharge education process that were examined through Likert-type statements. The need for clarification or further treatment was also examined through a series of dichotomous questions. Finally, the differences in perceptions in regards to the demographic variables were examined. A total of 48 patients were contacted with 30 completing the survey. A descriptive analysis of the responses on the Likert-type and the dichotomous questions was completed. An analysis of variance was completed to analyze differences in perceptions between groups. Data was analyzed using SPSS for Windows, Version 13. Results: Of the 30 patients that responded, 63% were very satisfied with 2 patients being very dissatisfied with the quality of their discharge education. Cronbach's alpha reliability assessment of the PSCI was .969 for the Likert-scored items and .824 for the dichotomous items. ANOVA testing was completed for comparing the demographic variables for differences in each of the dimensions of the education process. There were no statistically significant differences found. The greatest variance was in the age categories with those being age 56 and older being the most dissatisfied. Implications: Of interest was the trend that found those over the age of 56 being more dissatisfied with their discharge instructions. This finding can be significant in that it is during this time that many patients begin to have a decrease in comprehension ability and an increase in chronic illnesses with additional medications. This requires more, not less, education to be able to completely and competently care for them at home. Nursing needs to take the time to assess the educational needs of these patients in whatever setting the interaction takes place. With so many more people turning to the EDs for their healthcare, the teaching needs to take place at every step of the way. Repeating the study with a larger sample, in more facilities at a variety of times as well as translating the PSCI to capture non-English speaking patients may produce more significant findings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of Discharge Instructions by the Emergency Department Patienten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157206-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceptions of Discharge Instructions by the Emergency Department Patient</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brown, Darlene, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Las Vegas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">MSN Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">100 Milicity Road, Henderson, NV, 89012, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose and Aims: The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of the emergency department patient with regards to their discharge instructions. It also looks at the reasons, if any, people return to the ED for treatment and if there is any difference in these perceptions based upon gender, age, educational level or ethnicity. Background: The use of the ED is climbing at staggering numbers. For many, the ED is their only source of healthcare, with studies documenting multiple ED visits for the same patients within a 72 hour period, many for the same problem. For others, the ED is the entry portal of care. When this trend is added to that of nursing time spent with patients being compressed, one needs to look at whether this population of patients are getting the instructions they need to carry on their healthcare once they return home. This issue is further complicated by variances in the literacy levels of patients that seek care in the ED. An important aspect of nursing care is patient education that is completed in a manner that best benefits the patient. Methods: A descriptive survey study was completed on 30 adult patients that sought treatment in the ED during a time period in late summer months. Patients were approached at discharge regarding the study. If agreeable, they were given further information that included the purpose of the study along with an informational handout. Consents were obtained. These patients were then contacted one week later by telephone and were asked the questions on the Patient Survey of After-Care Instruction. Their responses were recorded by the researcher. This survey looked at various dimensions of the discharge education process that were examined through Likert-type statements. The need for clarification or further treatment was also examined through a series of dichotomous questions. Finally, the differences in perceptions in regards to the demographic variables were examined. A total of 48 patients were contacted with 30 completing the survey. A descriptive analysis of the responses on the Likert-type and the dichotomous questions was completed. An analysis of variance was completed to analyze differences in perceptions between groups. Data was analyzed using SPSS for Windows, Version 13. Results: Of the 30 patients that responded, 63% were very satisfied with 2 patients being very dissatisfied with the quality of their discharge education. Cronbach's alpha reliability assessment of the PSCI was .969 for the Likert-scored items and .824 for the dichotomous items. ANOVA testing was completed for comparing the demographic variables for differences in each of the dimensions of the education process. There were no statistically significant differences found. The greatest variance was in the age categories with those being age 56 and older being the most dissatisfied. Implications: Of interest was the trend that found those over the age of 56 being more dissatisfied with their discharge instructions. This finding can be significant in that it is during this time that many patients begin to have a decrease in comprehension ability and an increase in chronic illnesses with additional medications. This requires more, not less, education to be able to completely and competently care for them at home. Nursing needs to take the time to assess the educational needs of these patients in whatever setting the interaction takes place. With so many more people turning to the EDs for their healthcare, the teaching needs to take place at every step of the way. Repeating the study with a larger sample, in more facilities at a variety of times as well as translating the PSCI to capture non-English speaking patients may produce more significant findings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:39:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:39:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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