2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157207
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Empowerment During Nursing School: A Case Study
Abstract:
Empowerment During Nursing School: A Case Study
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Caley, Elizabeth, BA, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Porland VA Medical Center
Title:Staff Nurse
Contact Address:8604 SE Sherley Avenue, Vancouver, WA, 98664, USA
Contact Telephone:360-695-9675
Co-Authors:Miriam Hansen, BSN, RN; Marychar White, BA, BSN, RN; Amy Carmona, BA, BSN, RN; and Ben Oberreuter, BA, BSN, RN
Purpose: The purpose of this poster is to describe the process of empowerment in five student nurses following an experimental nursing school program change. Background: A private university in the northwest increased nursing school enrollment by switching from a traditional 9-month school year to a year-round format. This created a second cohort of nursing students that began their first term of upper-division nursing courses in the winter semester. This four-year university has a five semester curriculum that occurs during the junior and senior years of a baccalaureate education. In an attempt to maximize time during the second semester, the curriculum was condensed from 16 weeks to 13 weeks, resulting in up to 70 hours weekly of course and clinical work. Students and faculty experienced difficulties meeting the demands imposed by this condensed semester. As a result, 25% of the students did not progress to semester three. At the end of the second semester, faculty tried to collect data about the semester experience. However, the response rate was 30% and they were unable to utilize the data. Methods: The associate dean of this school of nursing encouraged the students to conduct a survey to address the previous poor response rate. Based on this request, five students developed a questionnaire of thirteen questions - ten multiple choice and three open-ended questions. The survey received a 75% response rate. Results: The survey identified the following difficulties with the curriculum change - 82% of respondents were dissatisfied with the second semester and 84% of respondents believed they learned less during a compressed semester. Survey results also indicated a need for more resources such as lengthened library hours. The open ended questions revealed a need for a longer semester and a mid-semester break. Results were presented in several forums including a curriculum committee meeting, faculty meeting and at a research forum later in the year. As a result of the survey several changes occurred, including removing 2 credits from the second semester, adding a mid-semester break and lengthening the semester. Implications: The students conducted a systematic review and developed concrete suggestions for the faculty. By presenting systematic data, these students opened the path of communications and specific changes were made to scheduling and curriculum. Many nursing schools strive to teach abstract concepts such as leadership and empowerment. The process used through this experience highlights factors that led to student empowerment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmpowerment During Nursing School: A Case Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157207-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Empowerment During Nursing School: A Case Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Caley, Elizabeth, BA, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Porland VA Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Staff Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">8604 SE Sherley Avenue, Vancouver, WA, 98664, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">360-695-9675</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lyzzcaley@comcast.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Miriam Hansen, BSN, RN; Marychar White, BA, BSN, RN; Amy Carmona, BA, BSN, RN; and Ben Oberreuter, BA, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this poster is to describe the process of empowerment in five student nurses following an experimental nursing school program change. Background: A private university in the northwest increased nursing school enrollment by switching from a traditional 9-month school year to a year-round format. This created a second cohort of nursing students that began their first term of upper-division nursing courses in the winter semester. This four-year university has a five semester curriculum that occurs during the junior and senior years of a baccalaureate education. In an attempt to maximize time during the second semester, the curriculum was condensed from 16 weeks to 13 weeks, resulting in up to 70 hours weekly of course and clinical work. Students and faculty experienced difficulties meeting the demands imposed by this condensed semester. As a result, 25% of the students did not progress to semester three. At the end of the second semester, faculty tried to collect data about the semester experience. However, the response rate was 30% and they were unable to utilize the data. Methods: The associate dean of this school of nursing encouraged the students to conduct a survey to address the previous poor response rate. Based on this request, five students developed a questionnaire of thirteen questions - ten multiple choice and three open-ended questions. The survey received a 75% response rate. Results: The survey identified the following difficulties with the curriculum change - 82% of respondents were dissatisfied with the second semester and 84% of respondents believed they learned less during a compressed semester. Survey results also indicated a need for more resources such as lengthened library hours. The open ended questions revealed a need for a longer semester and a mid-semester break. Results were presented in several forums including a curriculum committee meeting, faculty meeting and at a research forum later in the year. As a result of the survey several changes occurred, including removing 2 credits from the second semester, adding a mid-semester break and lengthening the semester. Implications: The students conducted a systematic review and developed concrete suggestions for the faculty. By presenting systematic data, these students opened the path of communications and specific changes were made to scheduling and curriculum. Many nursing schools strive to teach abstract concepts such as leadership and empowerment. The process used through this experience highlights factors that led to student empowerment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:39:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:39:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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