2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157208
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Quality of Life in Gastric Cancer Patients and Caregivers
Abstract:
Predictors of Quality of Life in Gastric Cancer Patients and Caregivers
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Cho, Maria, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco
Title:Assistant Adjunct Professor
Contact Address:2 Koret Way, Box 0610, R605R, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA
Contact Telephone:415-476-6975
Co-Authors:Marylin J. Dodd, RN, PhD, FAAN; and Geraldine Padilla, PhD
Purpose/Aims: To describe the predictors of quality of life (QOL) in Korean gastric cancer patients and their family caregivers.
Background: Cancer is not only a life threatening situation for the patient, but the anguish resulting from this diagnosis extends also to each family member. The experience of cancer potentially affects the physical, psychosocial, interpersonal and functional dimensions of life quality in patients and their family caregivers. However, there are few reports on those factors that influence of the QOL in Korean gastric cancer patients and their family caregivers. It is important to identify and understand these factors associated with QOL. Since gastric cancer has one of the highest prevalence rates in Korea, this study used those patients and their family caregivers. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used. Data were obtained from convenience sample of 103 gastric cancer patients and their family caregivers in an outpatient setting at a university hospital. Patient subjects included 71 males and 32 females with a mean age of 52 (SD 10.1). Of caregiver subjects, 80 (78%) were female, 23 (22%) were male; and their mean age was 48 years (SD 11.4). Overall, more than 60% of patients and caregivers had at least a high school education and a moderate income. A Demographic Questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Lee Fatigue Scale, CES-Depression Scale, and QOL Scale were used. These questionnaires have established reliability and validity. Results: The global QOL score for patients was 5.7 (SD= 0.58) and 5.8 (SD=0.51) for caregivers (0-10 scale, higher scores means better QOL), not a statistically significant difference between groups. Global QOL scores were correlated between the two groups (r=0.28, p<0.005). Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that in the patient group, after the variables in block 1 (gender, financial status, and health status) were entered, together account for 21.7% of variance in patient QOL. After adding block 2 (patients symptoms), the model as a whole explained approximately 43% of the variance (F (6,96)=11.82, p<0.005). In the caregiver group, after the variables in block 1 were entered (gender, financial status, and health status), the overall model explained 33% of the variance in caregiver's QOL. After block 2 (caregivers symptoms) was included, the model as a whole explained 43% (F (6,96)=12.26, p<0.005). In both groups, depression was the largest unique contribution to the variance in QOL (13% and 6%). Results from this study indicate that selected demographic variables and symptoms (i.e., depression and fatigue) in patients group was equally important in explaining variance in QOL, but demographic variables alone had a significant contribution to the variance in caregivers QOL.
Implications: The results of this study show that two symptoms adversely effect QOL and the oncology nurses need to assess for those symptoms. Study Funding: Sigma Theta Tau International, Alpha Eta Chapter, UCSF Graduate Research Award, American Cancer Society Doctoral Scholarship, and Nursing Research Training in Symptom Management. NIH/NINR, No.T32 Fellowship.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Quality of Life in Gastric Cancer Patients and Caregiversen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157208-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Quality of Life in Gastric Cancer Patients and Caregivers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cho, Maria, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Adjunct Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2 Koret Way, Box 0610, R605R, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">415-476-6975</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maria.cho@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marylin J. Dodd, RN, PhD, FAAN; and Geraldine Padilla, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: To describe the predictors of quality of life (QOL) in Korean gastric cancer patients and their family caregivers. <br/>Background: Cancer is not only a life threatening situation for the patient, but the anguish resulting from this diagnosis extends also to each family member. The experience of cancer potentially affects the physical, psychosocial, interpersonal and functional dimensions of life quality in patients and their family caregivers. However, there are few reports on those factors that influence of the QOL in Korean gastric cancer patients and their family caregivers. It is important to identify and understand these factors associated with QOL. Since gastric cancer has one of the highest prevalence rates in Korea, this study used those patients and their family caregivers. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used. Data were obtained from convenience sample of 103 gastric cancer patients and their family caregivers in an outpatient setting at a university hospital. Patient subjects included 71 males and 32 females with a mean age of 52 (SD 10.1). Of caregiver subjects, 80 (78%) were female, 23 (22%) were male; and their mean age was 48 years (SD 11.4). Overall, more than 60% of patients and caregivers had at least a high school education and a moderate income. A Demographic Questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Lee Fatigue Scale, CES-Depression Scale, and QOL Scale were used. These questionnaires have established reliability and validity. Results: The global QOL score for patients was 5.7 (SD= 0.58) and 5.8 (SD=0.51) for caregivers (0-10 scale, higher scores means better QOL), not a statistically significant difference between groups. Global QOL scores were correlated between the two groups (r=0.28, p&lt;0.005). Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that in the patient group, after the variables in block 1 (gender, financial status, and health status) were entered, together account for 21.7% of variance in patient QOL. After adding block 2 (patients symptoms), the model as a whole explained approximately 43% of the variance (F (6,96)=11.82, p&lt;0.005). In the caregiver group, after the variables in block 1 were entered (gender, financial status, and health status), the overall model explained 33% of the variance in caregiver's QOL. After block 2 (caregivers symptoms) was included, the model as a whole explained 43% (F (6,96)=12.26, p&lt;0.005). In both groups, depression was the largest unique contribution to the variance in QOL (13% and 6%). Results from this study indicate that selected demographic variables and symptoms (i.e., depression and fatigue) in patients group was equally important in explaining variance in QOL, but demographic variables alone had a significant contribution to the variance in caregivers QOL.<br/>Implications: The results of this study show that two symptoms adversely effect QOL and the oncology nurses need to assess for those symptoms. Study Funding: Sigma Theta Tau International, Alpha Eta Chapter, UCSF Graduate Research Award, American Cancer Society Doctoral Scholarship, and Nursing Research Training in Symptom Management. NIH/NINR, No.T32 Fellowship.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:39:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:39:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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