2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157209
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Overview: Saying "No": Co-Created Findings
Abstract:
Overview: Saying "No": Co-Created Findings
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Crist, Janice, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721-0203, USA
Contact Telephone:520-626-8768
Co-Authors:Marylyn Morris McEwen, PhD, APRN, BC; and Cathy Michaels, PhD, RN, FAAN
The symposium explores the phenomenon of saying "no" to services, from the standpoint of three research studies conducted with vulnerable populations. We discuss our findings from research that explored or tested our phenomena of interest. We describe the source of vulnerability of participants who make decisions without having complete understanding about either risk or benefits of services. We define vulnerability as being at higher than average risk for health related concerns. In Study 1, non-Hispanic white women decided if and when to have mammograms and did not feel vulnerable in their decisions, but confident and empowered. From the perspective of a nurse who mediates between concern for women's health and well-being and the most recent scientific understanding, however, participants may be vulnerable by only basing their decisions on family history, rather than both family history and aging. In Study 2, adults of Mexican descent at the US-Mexico border were vulnerable because of limited English language, low health literacy, stigmatization of people with positive tuberculosis, and a clash between professional, folk and popular explanatory models within the socio-economic and the meaning of tuberculosis in Mexico and the United States at the border. In Study 3, Mexican American elders and their family caregivers were recognized as vulnerable due to chronic illness, minority status, and lack of understanding of available services. Findings from all three studies reflect the importance of discovering the detail behind decisions, and discernment of the asymmetrical power relationships between individuals and the healthcare system, while pointing to the value for dialogue to engage multiple perspectives.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOverview: Saying "No": Co-Created Findingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157209-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Overview: Saying &quot;No&quot;: Co-Created Findings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Crist, Janice, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721-0203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-626-8768</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jcrist@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marylyn Morris McEwen, PhD, APRN, BC; and Cathy Michaels, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The symposium explores the phenomenon of saying &quot;no&quot; to services, from the standpoint of three research studies conducted with vulnerable populations. We discuss our findings from research that explored or tested our phenomena of interest. We describe the source of vulnerability of participants who make decisions without having complete understanding about either risk or benefits of services. We define vulnerability as being at higher than average risk for health related concerns. In Study 1, non-Hispanic white women decided if and when to have mammograms and did not feel vulnerable in their decisions, but confident and empowered. From the perspective of a nurse who mediates between concern for women's health and well-being and the most recent scientific understanding, however, participants may be vulnerable by only basing their decisions on family history, rather than both family history and aging. In Study 2, adults of Mexican descent at the US-Mexico border were vulnerable because of limited English language, low health literacy, stigmatization of people with positive tuberculosis, and a clash between professional, folk and popular explanatory models within the socio-economic and the meaning of tuberculosis in Mexico and the United States at the border. In Study 3, Mexican American elders and their family caregivers were recognized as vulnerable due to chronic illness, minority status, and lack of understanding of available services. Findings from all three studies reflect the importance of discovering the detail behind decisions, and discernment of the asymmetrical power relationships between individuals and the healthcare system, while pointing to the value for dialogue to engage multiple perspectives.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:39:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:39:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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