2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157210
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Information Technology on Patient Medication Safety
Abstract:
Impact of Information Technology on Patient Medication Safety
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Doyle, Mary, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona
Contact Address:2464 N. Highland Ave., Tucson, AZ, 85719, USA
Contact Telephone:520-325-8674
Purpose: The introduction of information technology designed to promote safe medication practice offers new opportunities for preventing medication errors. Bar code medication administration systems have been developed to improve patient safety and decrease medication errors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of one bar code system on medication administration errors (MAE). Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Medication errors are the second most frequent cause of injury among all types of medical errors (Leape, et al., 1991). One of the five stages of the medication process, medication administration has the second highest error incidence (Bates, Cullen, et al., 1995). Medication administration is a fundamental component of nursing practice, therefore nurses have substantial responsibility for preventing MAEs. The adoption of technology such as bar codes in nursing practice is transforming medication administration practice nationally but research or evidence to support effectiveness is limited. Rogers' (1995) theory, organizational diffusion of innovations, provided the study's framework.
Methods: A descriptive comparative design examined incidence of all MAEs (wrong patient, medication, dose, time, and route) for a six month period before (Time 1) and another six month period after implementation (Time 2) of a bar code medication administration system on eight units in one medical center. Secondary analysis was conducted with error data previously collected via electronic incident reports. Nurse adherence to the medication administration procedure was assessed with a questionnaire created for the study. Results: Findings indicated that total MAEs increased from Time 1 (N=39) to Time 2 (N=44), however, wrong patient and wrong dose errors decreased. There was a statistically significant (p < 0.05) increase in wrong route errors at Time 2. Overall nurse adherence was high despite reports of software, equipment, and other work environment constraints that hindered completion of certain procedure steps. Implications: Study findings were significant to patient safety research, nursing practice, and nursing work environments. Comparison of the findings with literature on the effectiveness of bar code systems revealed the limited development of bar code system research due to diversity of methods and statistical analyses. The small volume of MAE was not unexpected since previous research had established that self-report captures less than 10% of errors otherwise discovered via chart review, direct observation, or other electronic methods. Reliance on self-reported data has implications for practice when those data continue to be used for research and quality improvement. Improving MAE data quality is essential for identifying MAE trends that guide information technology design. Finally, work environment constraints that interfere with adherence to procedure have implications for achieving a culture of safety, now recommended as crucial for the promotion of patient safety. This study was supported by Mary Walters, RN, MS, and the Department of Veterans Affairs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Information Technology on Patient Medication Safetyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157210-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of Information Technology on Patient Medication Safety</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Doyle, Mary, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2464 N. Highland Ave., Tucson, AZ, 85719, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-325-8674</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mdoyle@dakotacom.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The introduction of information technology designed to promote safe medication practice offers new opportunities for preventing medication errors. Bar code medication administration systems have been developed to improve patient safety and decrease medication errors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of one bar code system on medication administration errors (MAE). Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Medication errors are the second most frequent cause of injury among all types of medical errors (Leape, et al., 1991). One of the five stages of the medication process, medication administration has the second highest error incidence (Bates, Cullen, et al., 1995). Medication administration is a fundamental component of nursing practice, therefore nurses have substantial responsibility for preventing MAEs. The adoption of technology such as bar codes in nursing practice is transforming medication administration practice nationally but research or evidence to support effectiveness is limited. Rogers' (1995) theory, organizational diffusion of innovations, provided the study's framework.<br/>Methods: A descriptive comparative design examined incidence of all MAEs (wrong patient, medication, dose, time, and route) for a six month period before (Time 1) and another six month period after implementation (Time 2) of a bar code medication administration system on eight units in one medical center. Secondary analysis was conducted with error data previously collected via electronic incident reports. Nurse adherence to the medication administration procedure was assessed with a questionnaire created for the study. Results: Findings indicated that total MAEs increased from Time 1 (N=39) to Time 2 (N=44), however, wrong patient and wrong dose errors decreased. There was a statistically significant (p &lt; 0.05) increase in wrong route errors at Time 2. Overall nurse adherence was high despite reports of software, equipment, and other work environment constraints that hindered completion of certain procedure steps. Implications: Study findings were significant to patient safety research, nursing practice, and nursing work environments. Comparison of the findings with literature on the effectiveness of bar code systems revealed the limited development of bar code system research due to diversity of methods and statistical analyses. The small volume of MAE was not unexpected since previous research had established that self-report captures less than 10% of errors otherwise discovered via chart review, direct observation, or other electronic methods. Reliance on self-reported data has implications for practice when those data continue to be used for research and quality improvement. Improving MAE data quality is essential for identifying MAE trends that guide information technology design. Finally, work environment constraints that interfere with adherence to procedure have implications for achieving a culture of safety, now recommended as crucial for the promotion of patient safety. This study was supported by Mary Walters, RN, MS, and the Department of Veterans Affairs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:40:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:40:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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