2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157211
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Workplace Violence in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
Abstract:
Workplace Violence in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Early, Margaret, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Reno
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:1076 Mayflower Drive, Reno, NV, 89509-7125, USA
Contact Telephone:775-784-6841
Co-Authors:Suzanne Perumean-Chaney, MA, PhD
Purpose: To examine the nature of workplace violence in a random sample of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nurses nationally and to determine the effects of three types of violence (direct, aggression, vicarious) on physical and psychological health and work affect.
Background: Violence directed at nurses in the workplace is increasing, yet reports of such activity may be unreliable because of underreporting. Nurses are subjected to assault from visitors, families and co-workers. The effects of workplace violence on nurses range from nurses being constantly on guard, to contemplating, or actually quitting the practice of nursing. This is of special concern in a time of nursing shortage crisis. High stress atmosphere in intensive care units contributes to the potential for violence. It is unclear what effect experiencing violence in the workplace has on nurses and nursing care in the NICU. Methods: Interactive, web-based survey design. A national non-probability sample of 229 NICU nurses were recruited from a professional organization data base. A 64 item survey included questions on demographics, physical and psychological health, experience of violence and aggression at work, and questions about work-related affect and intention for turnover.
Results: The nurses reported more experiences with aggression than acts of direct violence during the past year. Three quarters of the sample (75.8%) reported having seen or heard of violence at work. Multiple ordinary least squared (OLS) regression analyses indicated that the three types of violence have some negative impact on either participants' physical health, emotional health, or work affect. Direct experience with violence or aggression predicted a decline in the participants' general emotional health (p=.003 and p=.019 respectively). Both violence and aggression negatively affected a participant's work affect (p=.005 and p=.001 respectively). Twenty-three percent of the nurses indicated they would look for a job outside of their current organization in the coming year, and 11.9% indicated that they would look for a new occupation in the next year. Implications: Workplace violence, in general, may affect physical and emotional health of nurses. Aggression was significantly related to a reduction in positive affect toward work. Because aggression has an impact on affect toward work, administrators and researchers may want to focus on these "less serious" forms of violence as they may result in a lack of productivity, turn-over or increased sick days. Such perceptions among NICU nurses should be cause for concern for nurse managers and administration, and should be looked at more closely.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorkplace Violence in the Neonatal Intensive Care Uniten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157211-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Workplace Violence in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Early, Margaret, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Reno</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1076 Mayflower Drive, Reno, NV, 89509-7125, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">775-784-6841</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mearly@unr.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Suzanne Perumean-Chaney, MA, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To examine the nature of workplace violence in a random sample of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nurses nationally and to determine the effects of three types of violence (direct, aggression, vicarious) on physical and psychological health and work affect.<br/>Background: Violence directed at nurses in the workplace is increasing, yet reports of such activity may be unreliable because of underreporting. Nurses are subjected to assault from visitors, families and co-workers. The effects of workplace violence on nurses range from nurses being constantly on guard, to contemplating, or actually quitting the practice of nursing. This is of special concern in a time of nursing shortage crisis. High stress atmosphere in intensive care units contributes to the potential for violence. It is unclear what effect experiencing violence in the workplace has on nurses and nursing care in the NICU. Methods: Interactive, web-based survey design. A national non-probability sample of 229 NICU nurses were recruited from a professional organization data base. A 64 item survey included questions on demographics, physical and psychological health, experience of violence and aggression at work, and questions about work-related affect and intention for turnover.<br/>Results: The nurses reported more experiences with aggression than acts of direct violence during the past year. Three quarters of the sample (75.8%) reported having seen or heard of violence at work. Multiple ordinary least squared (OLS) regression analyses indicated that the three types of violence have some negative impact on either participants' physical health, emotional health, or work affect. Direct experience with violence or aggression predicted a decline in the participants' general emotional health (p=.003 and p=.019 respectively). Both violence and aggression negatively affected a participant's work affect (p=.005 and p=.001 respectively). Twenty-three percent of the nurses indicated they would look for a job outside of their current organization in the coming year, and 11.9% indicated that they would look for a new occupation in the next year. Implications: Workplace violence, in general, may affect physical and emotional health of nurses. Aggression was significantly related to a reduction in positive affect toward work. Because aggression has an impact on affect toward work, administrators and researchers may want to focus on these &quot;less serious&quot; forms of violence as they may result in a lack of productivity, turn-over or increased sick days. Such perceptions among NICU nurses should be cause for concern for nurse managers and administration, and should be looked at more closely.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:40:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:40:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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