2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157212
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Well Does Theory Predict Adolescents' Sexual Behaviors?
Abstract:
How Well Does Theory Predict Adolescents' Sexual Behaviors?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Koniak-Griffin, Deborah, EdD, RNC, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California Los Angeles
Title:Professor & Audrienne H. Moseley Endowed Chair Women's Health Research
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Box 956919, Factor Bldg, Rm 5-232, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6919, USA
Contact Telephone:310-206-3842
Co-Authors:Judith Stein, PhD
A number of theory-based HIV prevention programs designed to reduce sexual risk-taking behaviors of adolescents have been tested in clinical trials. Evaluations of these interventions generally focus on their impact on adolescents' behaviors rather than examine whether underlying theoretical assumptions are supported. Further knowledge is needed about the impact of HIV interventions on underlying theoretical constructs (e.g., self-efficacy, behavioral intentions, perceived behavioral control) derived from commonly employed theories (social cognitive theory and the theory of reasoned action) and the relationship of these constructs to program outcomes. Purpose: To determine (a) whether adolescent mothers in an HIV prevention program had significantly greater perceived self-efficacy and perceived behavioral control to use condoms, and more favorable outcome expectancies and subjective norms regarding condom use than those in a health education control group, 3 months post-intervention; and (b) the impact of the 3-month post-intervention theoretical variables on intentions to use condoms at 3 months and sexual risk behaviors at 6 months. Methods: Structural equation modeling with latent variables was used to assess the influence of theoretical variables and treatment condition employing data from 496 participants (78% Latinas, 18% African Americans) who completed questionnaires at baseline and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. The pregnant and parenting adolescents in this study received either a 4-session HIV prevention program or a comparable length control. Both conditions were offered in small groups and included skill-building activities of a differing nature. Results: Substantial improvements were demonstrated by both groups, with a slight advantage for the HIV prevention group, on all theoretical variables between pretest and the follow-ups. In the predictive model, the intervention group reported significantly fewer sex partners. Using intentions to use condoms as a mediator, greater self-efficacy, hedonistic beliefs, positive subjective norms, and less unprotected sex predicted intentions to use condoms, which, in turn, predicted less unprotected sex. Lower subjective norms modestly predicted multiple partners. Significant indirect paths mediated through intentions to use condoms were observed. Conclusions/Implications: These data support a relationship among several constructs from social cognitive theory and the theory of reasoned action, and subsequent sexual risk behaviors. HIV prevention programs for adolescent mothers should be designed to include these theoretical constructs and to address contextual factors influencing their lives. Based upon these results, nurses are encouraged to continue developing and utilizing theory-based interventions as well as to consider the realities and challenges faced by high-risk youth such as adolescent mothers. These findings contribute to the nursing knowledge base critical for culturally-competent practice environments. This study was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research, 1R01-NR04375.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow Well Does Theory Predict Adolescents' Sexual Behaviors?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157212-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How Well Does Theory Predict Adolescents' Sexual Behaviors?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Koniak-Griffin, Deborah, EdD, RNC, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California Los Angeles</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; Audrienne H. Moseley Endowed Chair Women's Health Research</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Box 956919, Factor Bldg, Rm 5-232, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6919, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">310-206-3842</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dkoniak@sonnet.ucla.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith Stein, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A number of theory-based HIV prevention programs designed to reduce sexual risk-taking behaviors of adolescents have been tested in clinical trials. Evaluations of these interventions generally focus on their impact on adolescents' behaviors rather than examine whether underlying theoretical assumptions are supported. Further knowledge is needed about the impact of HIV interventions on underlying theoretical constructs (e.g., self-efficacy, behavioral intentions, perceived behavioral control) derived from commonly employed theories (social cognitive theory and the theory of reasoned action) and the relationship of these constructs to program outcomes. Purpose: To determine (a) whether adolescent mothers in an HIV prevention program had significantly greater perceived self-efficacy and perceived behavioral control to use condoms, and more favorable outcome expectancies and subjective norms regarding condom use than those in a health education control group, 3 months post-intervention; and (b) the impact of the 3-month post-intervention theoretical variables on intentions to use condoms at 3 months and sexual risk behaviors at 6 months. Methods: Structural equation modeling with latent variables was used to assess the influence of theoretical variables and treatment condition employing data from 496 participants (78% Latinas, 18% African Americans) who completed questionnaires at baseline and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. The pregnant and parenting adolescents in this study received either a 4-session HIV prevention program or a comparable length control. Both conditions were offered in small groups and included skill-building activities of a differing nature. Results: Substantial improvements were demonstrated by both groups, with a slight advantage for the HIV prevention group, on all theoretical variables between pretest and the follow-ups. In the predictive model, the intervention group reported significantly fewer sex partners. Using intentions to use condoms as a mediator, greater self-efficacy, hedonistic beliefs, positive subjective norms, and less unprotected sex predicted intentions to use condoms, which, in turn, predicted less unprotected sex. Lower subjective norms modestly predicted multiple partners. Significant indirect paths mediated through intentions to use condoms were observed. Conclusions/Implications: These data support a relationship among several constructs from social cognitive theory and the theory of reasoned action, and subsequent sexual risk behaviors. HIV prevention programs for adolescent mothers should be designed to include these theoretical constructs and to address contextual factors influencing their lives. Based upon these results, nurses are encouraged to continue developing and utilizing theory-based interventions as well as to consider the realities and challenges faced by high-risk youth such as adolescent mothers. These findings contribute to the nursing knowledge base critical for culturally-competent practice environments. This study was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research, 1R01-NR04375.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:40:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:40:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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