2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157216
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physical Fitness Assessment of Older Adults in the Primary Care Setting
Abstract:
Physical Fitness Assessment of Older Adults in the Primary Care Setting
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Purath, Janet, PhD, ARNP, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Intercollegiate College of Nursing, 2917 West Fort George Wright Drive, Spokane, WA, 99224-5293, USA
Contact Telephone:509-324-7299
Co-Authors:Susan Weber Buchholz, PhD, RN
Purpose: This study evaluated the use of efficient, low-cost physical fitness measures in primary care with a group of community-dwelling older adults. Specific aims were to: 1) describe levels of physical fitness, physical activity, health and well-being, barriers, benefits and self-determinism for physical activity in a group of community-living adults, 2) compare the traits of active and inactive older adults, 3) determine the utility and feasibility of physical fitness testing in primary care, and 4) evaluate the use of the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior (IMCHB) with this population. Background: Technological advances have greatly improved quality and quantity of life. However, many of these technological advances have resulted in a pervasive sedentary lifestyle that put aging adults at risk for chronic health problems and mobility impairment. Healthy People 2010 Progress Review recommends identifying effective physical activity intervention strategies for older adults. A potential source for providing physical activity interventions are primary care providers. However, physical activity and fitness assessment and counseling rates are for older adults are rare. This is a missed opportunity, as no other professional group has more contact with this population. Model: The framework used to guide this study is an adaptation of Cox's (1982) Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior (IMCHB). Method: This descriptive-correlational study used the following instruments to evaluate components of the IMCHB: 1) Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), 2) Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly, 3) the decisional balance inventory, 4) the physical activity self-determinism scale, and 5) the Senior Fitness Test battery (SFT). Data were obtained by self-report and nurse practitioner physical examination. Results: Twenty-six adults (16 women, 10 men) participated in this pilot study. Mean age was 65.9. Mean education was 12.8 years. Mean body mass index was 29.9. Correlations evaluated the hypotheses. The SFT revealed that older adults who participated in physical activity performed better on strength measures for the lower body (r = .538, p < .01) and upper body (r = .630, p < .001), as well as cardiorespiratory function (r = .405, p < .05), and dynamic balance (r = .421, p < .05). Two of the eight SF-36 subscales correlated positively with greater physical activity: general health (r = .461, p < .05) and physical function (r = .597, p < .05). The SF-36 subscales of physical and emotional role, social functioning, mental health, bodily pain, and vitality were not significantly different. Physically active older adults did not report significantly different barriers and benefits to physical activity than their inactive peers. The IMCHB was partially supported in this study as evidenced by active elders reporting higher judgment scores. The SFT took less than 15 minutes to complete in the primary care setting. One component of the SFT, cardiorespiratory fitness, was the most difficult to complete with this sample. Implications: The development of evidence-based, low-cost, tailored strategies to assess and maintain the fitness of community-dwelling older adults can greatly enhance quality of life and health. Nurse practitioners working in a variety of clinical settings are integral to promoting the benefits of physical fitness among the elderly.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysical Fitness Assessment of Older Adults in the Primary Care Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157216-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physical Fitness Assessment of Older Adults in the Primary Care Setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Purath, Janet, PhD, ARNP, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Intercollegiate College of Nursing, 2917 West Fort George Wright Drive, Spokane, WA, 99224-5293, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">509-324-7299</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jpurath@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan Weber Buchholz, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study evaluated the use of efficient, low-cost physical fitness measures in primary care with a group of community-dwelling older adults. Specific aims were to: 1) describe levels of physical fitness, physical activity, health and well-being, barriers, benefits and self-determinism for physical activity in a group of community-living adults, 2) compare the traits of active and inactive older adults, 3) determine the utility and feasibility of physical fitness testing in primary care, and 4) evaluate the use of the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior (IMCHB) with this population. Background: Technological advances have greatly improved quality and quantity of life. However, many of these technological advances have resulted in a pervasive sedentary lifestyle that put aging adults at risk for chronic health problems and mobility impairment. Healthy People 2010 Progress Review recommends identifying effective physical activity intervention strategies for older adults. A potential source for providing physical activity interventions are primary care providers. However, physical activity and fitness assessment and counseling rates are for older adults are rare. This is a missed opportunity, as no other professional group has more contact with this population. Model: The framework used to guide this study is an adaptation of Cox's (1982) Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior (IMCHB). Method: This descriptive-correlational study used the following instruments to evaluate components of the IMCHB: 1) Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), 2) Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly, 3) the decisional balance inventory, 4) the physical activity self-determinism scale, and 5) the Senior Fitness Test battery (SFT). Data were obtained by self-report and nurse practitioner physical examination. Results: Twenty-six adults (16 women, 10 men) participated in this pilot study. Mean age was 65.9. Mean education was 12.8 years. Mean body mass index was 29.9. Correlations evaluated the hypotheses. The SFT revealed that older adults who participated in physical activity performed better on strength measures for the lower body (r = .538, p &lt; .01) and upper body (r = .630, p &lt; .001), as well as cardiorespiratory function (r = .405, p &lt; .05), and dynamic balance (r = .421, p &lt; .05). Two of the eight SF-36 subscales correlated positively with greater physical activity: general health (r = .461, p &lt; .05) and physical function (r = .597, p &lt; .05). The SF-36 subscales of physical and emotional role, social functioning, mental health, bodily pain, and vitality were not significantly different. Physically active older adults did not report significantly different barriers and benefits to physical activity than their inactive peers. The IMCHB was partially supported in this study as evidenced by active elders reporting higher judgment scores. The SFT took less than 15 minutes to complete in the primary care setting. One component of the SFT, cardiorespiratory fitness, was the most difficult to complete with this sample. Implications: The development of evidence-based, low-cost, tailored strategies to assess and maintain the fitness of community-dwelling older adults can greatly enhance quality of life and health. Nurse practitioners working in a variety of clinical settings are integral to promoting the benefits of physical fitness among the elderly.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:40:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:40:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.