2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157217
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Easing Chronic Suffering: A Survey of Hospices Use of Complementary Therapy
Abstract:
Easing Chronic Suffering: A Survey of Hospices Use of Complementary Therapy
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Running, Alice, PhD, RN, APN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Reno
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:P.O. Box 9435, Reno, NV, 89507, USA
Contact Telephone:775-784-6841
Co-Authors:Alice Running, PhD, RN, APN
Purpose: Hospice services, when available, provide some relief from pain and suffering for people at the end of their lives. Increasingly, health care consumers are requesting relief interventions that have been considered "complementary" to traditional medical interventions. These therapies are known to increase ease and comfort, relieve pain, and improve quality of life; outcomes especially relevant for rural elders with chronic illness at the end of their lives. The specific aims for this study are to identify what complementary therapy services are provided to clients receiving care from hospices in Nevada and Montana, and to identify differences in complementary therapy services provided to urban and rural hospice clients. The purpose of this poster presentation is to describe the study. Background: As older people live longer with chronic illness that require ongoing management of disease processes and attendant symptoms, having a wide array of treatments and services available becomes more important. This is especially true for services to help manage pain and symptoms at the terminal stages of chronic illness. Methods: A descriptive survey design will be used. Surveys will be sent to all hospice administrators in Nevada and Montana (N=58). Descriptive statistics will be used to summarize the survey questions addressing the first aim; the identification of complementary therapy services. Chi Square statistics will be used to identify differences in services among rural and urban hospices addressing the second aim. Responses to qualitative questions will be analyzed using content analysis methods. It is anticipated that results of this study will produce a richer and more in-depth understanding of the use of complementary therapies by older adults, in particular older adults with chronic illness at the end of their lives. Results: It is anticipated that, at the time of the poster presentation, initial data will be available from the survey regarding types of therapy available, and rural and urban differences. Implications: Complementary therapies, and their use at end of life is an area of study that can inform researchers, practitioners, and patients about easing suffering at the end of life. Funding: NIH/NINR (IP20NR07790-01), Center for Research on Chronic Health Conditions, Montana State University-Bozeman, College of Nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEasing Chronic Suffering: A Survey of Hospices Use of Complementary Therapyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157217-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Easing Chronic Suffering: A Survey of Hospices Use of Complementary Therapy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Running, Alice, PhD, RN, APN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Reno</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">P.O. Box 9435, Reno, NV, 89507, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">775-784-6841</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">running@unr.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Alice Running, PhD, RN, APN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Hospice services, when available, provide some relief from pain and suffering for people at the end of their lives. Increasingly, health care consumers are requesting relief interventions that have been considered &quot;complementary&quot; to traditional medical interventions. These therapies are known to increase ease and comfort, relieve pain, and improve quality of life; outcomes especially relevant for rural elders with chronic illness at the end of their lives. The specific aims for this study are to identify what complementary therapy services are provided to clients receiving care from hospices in Nevada and Montana, and to identify differences in complementary therapy services provided to urban and rural hospice clients. The purpose of this poster presentation is to describe the study. Background: As older people live longer with chronic illness that require ongoing management of disease processes and attendant symptoms, having a wide array of treatments and services available becomes more important. This is especially true for services to help manage pain and symptoms at the terminal stages of chronic illness. Methods: A descriptive survey design will be used. Surveys will be sent to all hospice administrators in Nevada and Montana (N=58). Descriptive statistics will be used to summarize the survey questions addressing the first aim; the identification of complementary therapy services. Chi Square statistics will be used to identify differences in services among rural and urban hospices addressing the second aim. Responses to qualitative questions will be analyzed using content analysis methods. It is anticipated that results of this study will produce a richer and more in-depth understanding of the use of complementary therapies by older adults, in particular older adults with chronic illness at the end of their lives. Results: It is anticipated that, at the time of the poster presentation, initial data will be available from the survey regarding types of therapy available, and rural and urban differences. Implications: Complementary therapies, and their use at end of life is an area of study that can inform researchers, practitioners, and patients about easing suffering at the end of life. Funding: NIH/NINR (IP20NR07790-01), Center for Research on Chronic Health Conditions, Montana State University-Bozeman, College of Nursing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:40:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:40:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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