2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157218
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Military Nursing Practice: Aeromedical Evacuation of Combat Casualties
Abstract:
Military Nursing Practice: Aeromedical Evacuation of Combat Casualties
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Ternus, Mona, PhD, RN, CNS, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:MSC09 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131, USA
Contact Telephone:505-272-4142
Introduction: Aeromedical evacuation (AE) is a primary operational mission for the U.S. Air Force Medical Service, which in one year, conducted 3,200 missions and supported more than 40,000 patient transports. Combat casualties from all service branches depend on the AE system as the critical link to life-saving, definitive care from the battlefield. Specific Aims: The specific aims of this study were to 1) describe the experiences of AE crew members that provided AE combat casualty care, and 2) develop theoretical constructs for combat casualty AE nursing practice.
Framework: The conceptual orientation for this research included utilization-focused evaluation and grounded theory. Utilization-focused evaluation involved stakeholders as an Advisory Panel that was interactive throughout the research process. This panel defined potential uses for the research at the outset, selected squadrons who were to be invited to participate, provided insight, and assisted with interpretation of findings. Grounded theory was used for the analysis and interpretation of the data, and constant comparative analysis (CCA) was used in the generation of theoretical constructs. Methods: The research question guiding this study was: What is the practice of combat casualty AE nursing post-September 11, 2001? Focus groups were conducted at eight AE squadrons representing active-duty, reserve, and guard components. Squadrons were purposefully selected to represent a wide variety of aeromedical operations and missions, to allow exploration of the similarities and differences in AE nursing practice influenced by aircraft type, urgency of operations, deployment time windows, and geographic location. Qualitative data from focus group interviews were analyzed for the emergence of patterns and themes utilizing grounded theory techniques and open, axial, and selective coding procedures. Research findings were presented to the Advisory Panel of AE experts, who were stakeholders in the research process and who participated in interpretation of the findings. Research presented to the Advisory Panel also reinforced the CCA in terms of the participants/researchers collective interpretation of findings to enhance the research and generate theoretical constructs.
Findings and Implications: These reported experiences provided insight into the current knowledge on which care for combat casualties is based and into the establishment and orchestration of an expeditionary AE system during combat operations. The nurses in this study not only had to maneuver within and manage this system to provide care, they at times had to build system components with minimal resources. Emerging from the data were findings related to the skills and competencies required of crew members, the personal nature of the experience, the human component of caring, the complexity of integrating operations with other services, the various lines of authority/communication, and the complexity, responsibilities, and impact of leadership. Understanding these characteristics of combat casualty AE care and the similarities and differences of AE from deployment locations has provided for the emergence of a general theory of AE combat casualty nursing practice that can be used by stakeholders to guide training, improve AE care, and enhance AE military readiness. Funding: TriService Nursing Research Program (MDA #905-03-TS10).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMilitary Nursing Practice: Aeromedical Evacuation of Combat Casualtiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157218-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Military Nursing Practice: Aeromedical Evacuation of Combat Casualties</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ternus, Mona, PhD, RN, CNS, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC09 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-272-4142</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mternus@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: Aeromedical evacuation (AE) is a primary operational mission for the U.S. Air Force Medical Service, which in one year, conducted 3,200 missions and supported more than 40,000 patient transports. Combat casualties from all service branches depend on the AE system as the critical link to life-saving, definitive care from the battlefield. Specific Aims: The specific aims of this study were to 1) describe the experiences of AE crew members that provided AE combat casualty care, and 2) develop theoretical constructs for combat casualty AE nursing practice. <br/>Framework: The conceptual orientation for this research included utilization-focused evaluation and grounded theory. Utilization-focused evaluation involved stakeholders as an Advisory Panel that was interactive throughout the research process. This panel defined potential uses for the research at the outset, selected squadrons who were to be invited to participate, provided insight, and assisted with interpretation of findings. Grounded theory was used for the analysis and interpretation of the data, and constant comparative analysis (CCA) was used in the generation of theoretical constructs. Methods: The research question guiding this study was: What is the practice of combat casualty AE nursing post-September 11, 2001? Focus groups were conducted at eight AE squadrons representing active-duty, reserve, and guard components. Squadrons were purposefully selected to represent a wide variety of aeromedical operations and missions, to allow exploration of the similarities and differences in AE nursing practice influenced by aircraft type, urgency of operations, deployment time windows, and geographic location. Qualitative data from focus group interviews were analyzed for the emergence of patterns and themes utilizing grounded theory techniques and open, axial, and selective coding procedures. Research findings were presented to the Advisory Panel of AE experts, who were stakeholders in the research process and who participated in interpretation of the findings. Research presented to the Advisory Panel also reinforced the CCA in terms of the participants/researchers collective interpretation of findings to enhance the research and generate theoretical constructs. <br/>Findings and Implications: These reported experiences provided insight into the current knowledge on which care for combat casualties is based and into the establishment and orchestration of an expeditionary AE system during combat operations. The nurses in this study not only had to maneuver within and manage this system to provide care, they at times had to build system components with minimal resources. Emerging from the data were findings related to the skills and competencies required of crew members, the personal nature of the experience, the human component of caring, the complexity of integrating operations with other services, the various lines of authority/communication, and the complexity, responsibilities, and impact of leadership. Understanding these characteristics of combat casualty AE care and the similarities and differences of AE from deployment locations has provided for the emergence of a general theory of AE combat casualty nursing practice that can be used by stakeholders to guide training, improve AE care, and enhance AE military readiness. Funding: TriService Nursing Research Program (MDA #905-03-TS10).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:40:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:40:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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