2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157219
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social Comparison Uses Scale: Examining the Measurement Model
Abstract:
Social Comparison Uses Scale: Examining the Measurement Model
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Tigges, Beth, PhD, RN, BC, PNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, MSCO9 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-1061, USA
Contact Telephone:505-272-6787
Specific Aims: The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the measurement model of a new instrument, the Social Comparison Uses Scale (SCUS), designed to assess adolescents' motives for comparing themselves with others when they think about pregnancy and pregnancy prevention. Background and Methods: Social comparison is a psychological process that may have implications for adolescent pregnancy prevention, yet there has been little systematic effort to develop reliable and valid instruments to measure this process. In earlier work, dimensions and items to describe adolescents' motives for social comparisons related to pregnancy prevention were developed based on a content analysis of the results of focus groups of 9th grade adolescents and validated by a panel of five content validity experts. The preliminary instrument (six dimensions, 35 items) was administered to a development sample of 417 9th and 10th grade adolescents at a public high school [14-18 years old (M=15.26; SD=.80); 53% female; 66% Hispanic white; 45% sexually active]. Exploratory factor analysis using principal axis factoring with oblique rotation resulted in a 19-item, five-factor solution explaining 50% of the variance. Cronbach's alpha coefficients for the five factors ranged from .71 to .85. Because factor analysis resulted in one factor with mixed loadings that was not entirely consistent with predictions, the measurement model was examined further using structural equation modeling (AMOS). Results: Structural equation modeling was used to test three separate measurement models: a first-order five-factor model; a second-order five-factor model; and a one-factor model. Neither the first-order nor the second-order five-factor models provided the best fit for the data (see Table). Initial testing of the 19-item one-factor model provided an even poorer fit but was examined further because exploratory factor analyses had demonstrated a major factor loaded with items from multiple dimensions. Items were eliminated from the model based on modification indices. A final eight-item, one factor model provided excellent fit for the data. The eight items covered the six proposed dimensions of the SCUS and had a Cronbach's alpha of .86. (Headings in table: Measurement Model / X square (df) / NFI / CFI / RMSEA; First-order five-factor model / 394.22 (142) / .88 / .92 / .067 (CI=.059-.075; p=.00); Second-order five-factor model/ 252.76 (111) / .91 / .95/ .057 (CI=.047-.066; p=.12); One-factor model (8 item) / 36.41 (20) / .97/ .99 / .045 (CI=.020-.068; p=.60). Implications: The results suggest that eight items of the SCUS provide a reliable and valid scale for measuring overall motivation to use social comparisons related to pregnancy prevention. The instrument will be tested further in additional development samples. Funded by NIH/NINR, R15 NR05054-01A2.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial Comparison Uses Scale: Examining the Measurement Modelen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157219-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Social Comparison Uses Scale: Examining the Measurement Model</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tigges, Beth, PhD, RN, BC, PNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, MSCO9 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-1061, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-272-6787</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">btigges@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Specific Aims: The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the measurement model of a new instrument, the Social Comparison Uses Scale (SCUS), designed to assess adolescents' motives for comparing themselves with others when they think about pregnancy and pregnancy prevention. Background and Methods: Social comparison is a psychological process that may have implications for adolescent pregnancy prevention, yet there has been little systematic effort to develop reliable and valid instruments to measure this process. In earlier work, dimensions and items to describe adolescents' motives for social comparisons related to pregnancy prevention were developed based on a content analysis of the results of focus groups of 9th grade adolescents and validated by a panel of five content validity experts. The preliminary instrument (six dimensions, 35 items) was administered to a development sample of 417 9th and 10th grade adolescents at a public high school [14-18 years old (M=15.26; SD=.80); 53% female; 66% Hispanic white; 45% sexually active]. Exploratory factor analysis using principal axis factoring with oblique rotation resulted in a 19-item, five-factor solution explaining 50% of the variance. Cronbach's alpha coefficients for the five factors ranged from .71 to .85. Because factor analysis resulted in one factor with mixed loadings that was not entirely consistent with predictions, the measurement model was examined further using structural equation modeling (AMOS). Results: Structural equation modeling was used to test three separate measurement models: a first-order five-factor model; a second-order five-factor model; and a one-factor model. Neither the first-order nor the second-order five-factor models provided the best fit for the data (see Table). Initial testing of the 19-item one-factor model provided an even poorer fit but was examined further because exploratory factor analyses had demonstrated a major factor loaded with items from multiple dimensions. Items were eliminated from the model based on modification indices. A final eight-item, one factor model provided excellent fit for the data. The eight items covered the six proposed dimensions of the SCUS and had a Cronbach's alpha of .86. (Headings in table: Measurement Model / X square (df) / NFI / CFI / RMSEA; First-order five-factor model / 394.22 (142) / .88 / .92 / .067 (CI=.059-.075; p=.00); Second-order five-factor model/ 252.76 (111) / .91 / .95/ .057 (CI=.047-.066; p=.12); One-factor model (8 item) / 36.41 (20) / .97/ .99 / .045 (CI=.020-.068; p=.60). Implications: The results suggest that eight items of the SCUS provide a reliable and valid scale for measuring overall motivation to use social comparisons related to pregnancy prevention. The instrument will be tested further in additional development samples. Funded by NIH/NINR, R15 NR05054-01A2.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:40:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:40:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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