2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157220
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Intimate Partner Violence and Pregnancy: Qualitative Analysis of Outcomes
Abstract:
Intimate Partner Violence and Pregnancy: Qualitative Analysis of Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Williams, Gail, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas HSC at San Antonio
Title:Professor
Contact Address:9327 Silent Oaks, San Antonio, TX, 78250, USA
Contact Telephone:210-567-3811
Co-Authors:Margaret H. Brackley, PhD, APRN, BC and Margit Gerardi, MSN, RN
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this descriptive exploratory study was to gain a better understanding of the outcomes of intimate partner violence (IPV) from the perspective of women who have experienced IPV during pregnancy. Background: Intimate partner violence is the leading cause of serious injury to women and accounts for more than half of all female homicides in the U.S. Furthermore, violence during pregnancy has been estimated to affect between 0.9% and 20.1% of all pregnant women. Women with unplanned pregnancies are four times more likely to be battered during pregnancy. Methods: Transcribed audio-taped interviews were organized with the qualitative software program QRS NUD.IST and content analysis was performed to identify themes. SPSS used to describe sample demographics and the prevalence of the types of violence experienced by this group of women as measured by the Conflict Tactics Scales (CTS2). Results: The final sample consisted of 21 pregnant women with a mean age of 23 years. The majority were Hispanic (71.4%), single (66.7%), and had completed high school or GED (52.4%). Seventy-one percent were no longer living with the perpetrator and all women self-reported that pregnancy was unplanned. Results of the CTS2 indicated that all women (100%) experienced psychological aggression; 95% (n=20) experienced physical assault, and 33% (n=7) experienced sexual coercion. Prevalent themes included hopelessness, isolation, worsening of preexistent psychological disorders, emotional blunting, fear of future violence, negative emotional sequelae to their children, economic losses, and loss of support from friends and family. Interestingly, women voiced positive outcomes of the violence that included finding inner strength, reestablishing social support systems, and valuing of one's children. Implications: Results of this study help to build knowledge for nursing practice in the area of violence prevention and intervention. A more thorough understanding of the outcomes of IPV in the lives of pregnant women also allows healthcare providers to anticipate and meet both short and long term needs of this population of women. Funding Source: Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) NIH NINR R15NR07724.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntimate Partner Violence and Pregnancy: Qualitative Analysis of Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157220-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Intimate Partner Violence and Pregnancy: Qualitative Analysis of Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Williams, Gail, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas HSC at San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9327 Silent Oaks, San Antonio, TX, 78250, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">210-567-3811</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">williamsg@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret H. Brackley, PhD, APRN, BC and Margit Gerardi, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this descriptive exploratory study was to gain a better understanding of the outcomes of intimate partner violence (IPV) from the perspective of women who have experienced IPV during pregnancy. Background: Intimate partner violence is the leading cause of serious injury to women and accounts for more than half of all female homicides in the U.S. Furthermore, violence during pregnancy has been estimated to affect between 0.9% and 20.1% of all pregnant women. Women with unplanned pregnancies are four times more likely to be battered during pregnancy. Methods: Transcribed audio-taped interviews were organized with the qualitative software program QRS NUD.IST and content analysis was performed to identify themes. SPSS used to describe sample demographics and the prevalence of the types of violence experienced by this group of women as measured by the Conflict Tactics Scales (CTS2). Results: The final sample consisted of 21 pregnant women with a mean age of 23 years. The majority were Hispanic (71.4%), single (66.7%), and had completed high school or GED (52.4%). Seventy-one percent were no longer living with the perpetrator and all women self-reported that pregnancy was unplanned. Results of the CTS2 indicated that all women (100%) experienced psychological aggression; 95% (n=20) experienced physical assault, and 33% (n=7) experienced sexual coercion. Prevalent themes included hopelessness, isolation, worsening of preexistent psychological disorders, emotional blunting, fear of future violence, negative emotional sequelae to their children, economic losses, and loss of support from friends and family. Interestingly, women voiced positive outcomes of the violence that included finding inner strength, reestablishing social support systems, and valuing of one's children. Implications: Results of this study help to build knowledge for nursing practice in the area of violence prevention and intervention. A more thorough understanding of the outcomes of IPV in the lives of pregnant women also allows healthcare providers to anticipate and meet both short and long term needs of this population of women. Funding Source: Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) NIH NINR R15NR07724.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:40:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:40:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.